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Let’s Get to Work

first_imgEMC’s Information Intelligence Group is focused on helping customers transform their business with software and cloud solutions that connect information to work. It’s our mission statement, but even more important, it’s our sole focus.For our enterprise customers, all work is knowledge work. By work we mean the processes and collaboration that drive the daily activity of our customers.  Examples of work are processing a loan, answering a customer service complaint, testing a drug, using a design document to repair an aircraft, designing a new car by sharing new ideas with teams, inside and outside the firewall, or accessing the latest price list, whether the worker is at her desktop or on the go.  In each of these cases, the work is only productive if all the information needed is available when and where it is needed.Wrapping Information, Process, and Collaboration with governance policies in order to protect and track information, while making the information mobile and cloud enabled, is how we think companies truly transform their businesses to derive more value.I recently met with a CIO at one of the world’s largest transportation companies in Europe. His company required a single system to manage and share a vast number of technical documents and engineering drawings, and wanted to integrate that repository with other applications that run his business. The system had to be accessible by internal and external teams with the proper rights so each group had access to certain content. The clincher was, he had weeks – not years – to get a system implemented. In this case, work meant having the right technical information available via the right application to the right person whether inside or outside the firewall.  This is a great example of combining Information, Process and Collaboration together to get work done.Our team helped meet the challenge, configuring a solution that would be hosted in the cloud to accelerate time to value. The CIO’s team determined that over the course of five years, they would realize more than 40% annualized savings with this approach versus building their own solution and managing it in their own data center.Delivering cloud-based solutions to get work done…that’s where IIG is headed.last_img read more

Student assault victim shares experience

first_imgThe Justice Education Department at Saint Mary’s began its “Week Against Violence” on Tuesday night in the Student Center with the discussion “Beyond the Violence,” led by Saint Mary’s junior Jessica Richmond, who discussed her personal account of violence.“Authenticity requires vulnerability, courage and integrity,” Richmond said, adding that she lives by these words.Richmond shared her story of physical and sexual assault to offer perspective and advice to her peers as fellow victims and friends of victims.Allison D’Ambrosia “People see vulnerability as being weak,” she said “But I build my life around viewing vulnerability as a strength ⎯ being open to having conversations like these, airing my dirty laundry, as I like to say.”Although Richmond openly shared her personal encounter with violence, she said she was once much more reluctant to speak about the horrific experience.“There are very few people in my life that knew what happened and to the great detail of what happened,” she said.Richmond, who shared her story with her father this past weekend, said her parents’ reactions to the events were why she did not want to tell them in the first place. Richmond said that upon hearing of her attack, her mother misdirected her frustration toward her daughter. She said her mother’s strong reaction made her more cautious about delving into details.“I almost felt as if there was resentment towards me for not telling her sooner,” Richmond said. “My mom immediately jumped to ‘What did he do to you?’ and being a victim, I recommend you never do that to someone because that instantly put me on the defensive. I didn’t want to tell her.”Richmond said many people, including her mother, have asked her why she did not report her attack.“I’m not trying to play into being young because I think there are many younger women that are stronger than I was [who are also] assaulted, but I was so scared,” she said. “I was so alone. I had no idea [of] the resources out there. I had no idea what to do. I was scared of him.”This fear lies in the systemic sexism of the United States’ judicial system, Richmond said.“Men have a power and an authority in society, and there’s a lot that goes into that,” Richmond said. “But he scared me to death. Even after knowing he no longer worked with me, he didn’t live near me, he terrified me.”Richmond said her decision to keep the attack private was an act of self-preservation.“It was the thought of going to the police and saying I wanted to press charges when there was no evidence and when no one knew about what had happened,” Richmond said. “I didn’t want to air my dirty laundry for the whole world to have him get a slap on the wrist.“I didn’t want to have to tell my story a thousand times only to be told ‘Well, there’s nothing we can do.’”Richmond said she also feared it would become a “he said, she said” situation, or she would be condemned for not explicitly saying “no.”“Life went on,” she said. “I didn’t report it. That is the one thing I come back to most often. Maybe I should have. Maybe if I called him to justice, it could have gone in my favor. I find myself still sort of switching a little bit, but I don’t regret not reporting.”Richmond said her decision not to report might not be the best choice for all other victims of violence. Each person should make an individual choice.“Do I think [other victims] should?” Richmond said. “Yes, because there’s a great chance [they] can get something out of it, but I think for my health I couldn’t. This is not ‘Law and Order.’ Due process doesn’t happen in 45 minutes.”Richmond said she attributes much of her growth since the attack to her boyfriend of three-and-a-half years.“He’s my support system,” she said. “It’s kind of strange because he’s a man, he’s six-foot-seven and almost three hundred pounds. He is my version of empowerment.”Richmond said her boyfriend and his sensitivity played key roles in her ability to heal.“I found that when we first started dating I had all sorts of triggers,” she said. “ A certain smell would throw me into a hysterical crying fit, a certain way of being touched, a certain playful comment. Sometimes it wasn’t the words that were being said; it was just the tone it was said in.“I can’t have my neck touched. That is like my one thing that will put me in a fetal position crying.”As a victim of violence, Richmond said it is amazing to have someone there to say, “Okay, that’s completely fine. I respect you for that.”“Once I got to that point, I became offended when people used tamer words because it’s oppressive,” she said. “Don’t be afraid of using the terms. Don’t be afraid to say, ‘She was raped.’”Richmond said that in spite of having a solid and healthy relationship with her boyfriend now, if she could go back in time she would tell her high school self that she did not need a man.“We’re women at such an amazing school with such an empowering philosophy that we can do anything,” she said. “I don’t want someone to stand in front of me.“That’s what’s great about [my] relationship now. [My boyfriend] stands behind me pushing me forward.”Adrienne Lyles-Chockley, head of the Justice Education Department, ended the discussion by offering Richmond affirmations on behalf of the audience.“This is such a gift and a refreshingly honest dialogue, so I want to affirm this and affirm you,” Lyles-Chockley said.The Justice Education professor said she also supported Richmond’s decision to not go to the police.“I’d also just like to affirm your choice not to report,” Lyles-Chockley said. “I appreciate that part of giving the person that was raped or assaulted control [means] granting them control of what happens next. So we support women by listening and helping according to their individual needs. Friends often don’t understand, and it’s just not that simple.”As a continuation of the “Week against Violence,” Saint Mary’s will host a panel presentation on community responses to violence against women, titled “Justice and the Victims: Beyond Law and Order,” on Thursday night at 7 p.m. in the Vander Vennet Theater. Tags: Justice Education Department, sexual assault, Week Against Violencelast_img read more

LeBron James, other Lakers express frustration on social media over death of George Floyd

first_imgAnother death of a black man in police custody has angered people around the NBA, including Lakers star LeBron James.A video of a Minneapolis police officer kneeling atop the neck of a man named George Floyd who later died circulated through news and social media circles. James weighed in on Instagram, posting a still from the video of the officer juxtaposed with a picture of former NFL player Colin Kaepernick kneeling on the field in protest, overlaid with the text: “This … Is Why.”“Do you understand NOW!!??!!?? Or is it still blurred to you??” he wrote.James has consistently spoken up about the shootings and killings of unarmed black men by law enforcement and others that have been brought to light in recent years by viral videos. Floyd died Monday after being arrested on suspicion of forgery, then sent to a hospital. The video shows the officer kneeling on his neck for several minutes as Floyd complains that he can’t breathe then appears to lose consciousness. Lakers practice early hoping to answer all questions AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREUCLA alum Kenny Clark signs four-year contract extension with PackersBoth officers in the video were fired Tuesday after it was determined the police report did not accurately catalog the incident captured on tape, and Minneapolis mayor Jacob Frey expressed shock and frustration with how the officers conducted themselves.Related Articles Lakers, Clippers schedules set for first round of NBA playoffs How athletes protesting the national anthem has evolved over 17 years Trail Blazers, Grizzlies advance to NBA play-in game; Suns, Spurs see playoff dreams dashed Trail Blazers beat Grizzlies in play-in, earn first-round series with the Lakers Newsroom GuidelinesNews TipsContact UsReport an Error James has campaigned for wider recognition of victims of such incidents such as Trayvon Martin, Eric Garner and Tamir Rice. Earlier this year, James expressed similar frustration on social media about the death of Georgia jogger Ahmaud Arbery who was shot by armed civilians. He has also expressed support for Kaepernick, whose kneeling protests of law enforcement killings of black men made him a persona non grata on NFL rosters.On the Lakers, Danny Green and Talen Horton-Tucker were among those to express similar messages as James, and assistant coach Phil Handy wrote in an Instagram story: “This BS needs to stop! #senseless.”last_img read more