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Newcastle ready to dole out £53m for wantaway Gareth Bale

first_img Loading… Newcastle are ‘ready to splash out £53million to offer Real Madrid’s wantaway star Gareth Bale a route back to the Premier League this summer. Bale has been unhappy in Madrid for some time, and it is now expected that he will leave the Spanish capital when the transfer window next opens.It is understood that three clubs are front-runners for the Welshman’s signature with Newcastle the most surprising among them.Elsewhere, David Beckham’s new Inter Miami side are said to be prepared to match his Real Madrid salary to bring him to their new MLS outfit, while Tottenham are also reportedly keen to seal his emotional return to north London. Mohammed bin Salman inching closer to Newcastle take over Newcastle, until recently, would unlikely have been in the running for a player of Bale’s stature, but their impending £300m Saudi takeover would take them to a new level of finance.Advertisement It has been reported that should the takeover go through in the coming weeks, which would see Mike Ashley relinquish control of the club, the Toon would have a large amount of money to spend in the transfer window.In the current coronavirus climate, Real Madrid appear likely to try and cash in on some of their expensive fringe players, with Bale and James Rodriguez among them. Bale left Tottenham for Real Madrid in 2013 and has spent the last seven years in Spain, winning everything on offer. Read AlsoReal Madrid star Gareth Bale admits MLS ambition New buyers of Newcastle are said to be ready not only to turn the fortune of the club around but also fortify the team enough to aim for top four finish and compete in the Champions league. FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail分享 center_img Promoted ContentCouples Who Celebrated Their Union In A Unique, Unforgettable Way14 Hilarious Comics Made By Women You Need To Follow Right NowBest Car Manufacturers In The WorldCan Playing Too Many Video Games Hurt Your Body?7 Truly Incredible Facts About Black Holes6 Incredibly Strange Facts About HurricanesBest & Worst Celebrity Endorsed Games Ever Made10 Risky Jobs Some Women DoThis Guy Photoshopped Himself Into Celeb Pics And It’s Hysterical5 Of The World’s Most Unique Theme Parks7 Universities In The World Where Education Costs Too Much11 Most Immersive Game To Play On Your Table Toplast_img read more

Record drop in house prices in Greece

first_imgThe Greek housing market posted the second-worst performance among European Union (EU) countries in the third quarter of 2013, as according to Bank of Greece data prices fell at an annual rate of 9.2 per cent following five years of decline. Eurostat announced this week that Greece was only second to new EU member Croatia in terms of the drop in house prices. At the same time a slowdown was observed in the rate of decline across the eurozone, with the average fall coming to just 1.3 per cent in Q3 compared to an annual slide of 2.4 per cent in the second quarter. Across the EU the drop amounted to no more than 0.5 per cent. The Greek property market picture is unlikely to change in the next few months, even though the total price decrease has reached 32 per cent across the country since the start of the financial crisis. Bank of Greece data published in a recent report points to an average waiting time of 12 months from when properties are put on the market to the actual sale, compared with just five months in 2009. The situation in the market is rapidly deteriorating, as it was only two months earlier that the country’s central bank had estimated the average waiting period before a house is sold at 10 months. Similarly, on average, buyers are able to negotiate 21.5 per cent off the asking price, while in early 2009 the difference was just 12.6 per cent. The Bank of Greece noted that the market continues to be dominated by excessive supply and a considerable decline in demand, which should be attributed to the major increase in unemployment and the reduction in households’ disposable incomes, the rise in property taxes, the instability of the tax framework and the lack of cash flow given banks’ very strict loan terms. Source: ekathimerini Facebook Twitter: @NeosKosmos Instagramlast_img read more