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Hitler’s birthplace shows that confronting dark past can take decades

first_imgAs anti-racism protesters topple statues of slave traders and colonizers worldwide, some nations are pondering how to mark their dark past. In Austria, debate over confronting one link to Adolf Hitler has taken decades, and it’s not over yet.Austria recently unveiled plans to convert the house where the Nazi leader was born, in the town of Braunau am Inn on the German border, into a police station.It also suggested moving a rock that stands on the sidewalk outside, which is inscribed with an anti-fascist message, to a Vienna museum. ‘Never again’The rock, which carries the inscriptions “fascism never again” and “millions of dead” but does not mention Hitler, was installed by the town in 1989.At that point, Austria was moving away from its position of denying responsibility for the Holocaust, a post-war stance during which it described itself as the first victim of the Nazis.Partly because of that, some say that Austria has done less to confront its Nazi past than neighboring Germany.”Sometimes it feels like something that is done as a chore rather than a commitment made out of deep conviction,” said Gerhard Baumgartner, a historian and scientific director at the Documentation Centre of Austrian Resistance.While progress has been made in terms of education on the Holocaust and erecting memorials since the 1980s, Jewish and survivors’ groups say more remains to be done, especially in explaining how widespread and systemic the Nazis’ crimes were.”That is very important – that people really know there was something everywhere,” said Charlotte Herman, head of the group officially representing the Jewish community in the province of Upper Austria, which includes Braunau.She and Mernyi mentioned the “Stolpersteine”, or “stumbling blocks”, project as one way to raise awareness.Originally a German initiative, it involves laying small brass plaques to Holocaust victims in the pavement at relevant places, like where they lived.Those plaques cover a fraction of Holocaust victims, but are a relatively common sight in Vienna, where a notoriously repressive and anti-Semitic system was put in place with local support after Hitler’s Germany annexed Austria in 1938.”In all of Austria, in every corner, in front of almost everyone’s door, something happened, whether it’s death marches, people walking past and dying in the street,” said Herman.Hitler’s role in history is well known, so there is no need to spell it out in great detail at the house, she added. But attention should be called to the building.”Because this is where evil was in fact born.”  While many agree that the house should not be allowed to become a pilgrimage site for neo-Nazis, the idea of removing the rock has upset some Jewish and survivors’ groups who have said that Austria must confront its role in the Holocaust.More consultations on the rock will now be held.”Clearly [the government] wants to let the world forget that the worst mass murderer in history was born in Braunau,” said Willi Mernyi, head of the Mauthausen Committee, Austria’s main Holocaust survivors’ group.”This approach is wrong … One must recognize what happened.”center_img Topics :last_img read more

Baylor’s Matt Rhule is Sporting News’ 2019 Coach of the Year

first_img“It’s just one of those things where my wife (Julie) and I just kind of made a decision based on faith,” Rhule told Sporting News. “We thought that this was where we were supposed to be. We knew Baylor was a great place, but that they had hit on hard times. We felt that we were uniquely suited to come here. We thought that we could turn it around. And really, turning it around, to me, meant turning it around off the field first. So we felt like if we could get it done off the field, then on the field success would follow.“Whereas a lot of people saw disaster, we saw an opportunity to go do something — not just something positive on the field, but also something really positive off the field as well.”MORE: Sporting News 2019 All-America teamRhule has turned that opportunity — from an 1-11 record in 2017 to an 11-2 campaign and Sugar Bowl berth this season — into Sporting News’ Coach of the Year for 2019.But wait: Did Rhule call Baylor “a great place” before he got there? What, in 2016, made Baylor a great place? From the Pepper Hamilton report, the exposés, the steady stream of statements and accusations, the convictions, the expulsions, the firings, even the Big 12 sanctions, there seemed little that was “great” about Baylor three years ago.Sure, there’s the company line about a commitment to excellence and high academic standards and competitive athletics and a strong Christian mission. Soon enough, though, Rhule returns to the heart of the matter — football — to explain why he took the job.“Unfortunately, despite having that mission, the football program wasn’t necessarily in line with that,” he told SN. “So I thought me, as the son of a high school football coach and minister, that maybe I could help get the football program back in line with the university and the university’s mission with a commitment to faith and service and leadership.”Rhule, 44, executed a similar on-field turnaround in his four years at Temple, taking the Owls from 2-10 in his first year to 10 wins in each of his last two in Philadelphia. He regards that first season in Temple as “our best coaching,” and said the same thing happened in Waco.The Bears “weren’t quite ready” to win in 2017, but those hard lessons from a 1-11 season produced five single-possession wins this year. The Bears twice took College Football Playoff-bound Oklahoma to the wire, including an overtime loss in the Big 12 championship game. They also tied a program-record 11 wins, and have a chance at one more.Winning football games is one thing, but winning back the Waco community and college football fans in general is something entirely different. Rhule’s players haven’t had any prolonged off-field issues since he got there. He said when he arrived, there were zero graduate students on the roster; now there are 10. Players are committed to community outreach projects. Family has become a centralized theme for the coaching staff.There are so many “How did you” questions for Rhule: How did you save your first recruiting class? How did you build this team up? How did you unite a fractured fan base?Start with recruiting. The departure of half the 2016 recruiting class, followed by a mass exodus of the 2017 group that left just one player — safety Jalen Pitre — meant Baylor’s future depended on much more than Rhule’s ability to parachute in and put out fires.“Kids hadn’t been on visits. Kids hadn’t been recruited,” Rhule said. “It wasn’t like there was a bunch of kids that had been recruited and then we just had a transition. We had to start over from scratch. It was really, really, really hard. But I think we looked at it as an opportunity.”Rhule’s first move was to hire David Wetzel, who was president of the Texas High School Football Coaches Association and played receiver at Baylor under Hall of Famer Grant Teaff. Wetzel was an accomplished coach at Reagan High School in San Antonio. But Wetzel “knew all the right people” among the Texas coaching ranks, and was invaluable for his connections. So Rhule made him assistant athletic director for football relations.Wetzel introduced Rhule to another successful Texas prep coach, Joey McGuire from Dallas suburb Cedar Hill. Rhule hired him to coach tight ends (he’s now associate head coach and works with defensive ends). From there, Rhule hired former Baylor quarterback and Cedar Ridge coach Shawn Bell, who’s now the offensive line coach.“Those were three of his first hires,” said Baylor play-by-play voice John Morris. “That was the first move, and it was very well thought out, very smart.”A Yankee like Rhule — native New Yorker, played at Penn State, coached in Philly — could have crashed and burned in Waco if he hadn’t reached out and brought some of the Texas coaches into the fold. In that endeavor, hiring Wetzel, McGuire and Bell — along with Evan Cooper, who followed Rhule from Temple — was a vitally important first step.In two months, that first recruiting class grew to Pitre and 26 others, including 20 Texas schoolboys, 17 of whom are still on the team. The list includes three-year starting quarterback Charlie Brewer (Austin-Lake Travis), as well as All-American defensive end James Lynch (Round Rock), All-Big 12 linebacker Terrel Bernard (LaPorte), Big 12 title game hero Trestan Ebner (Henderson) starting guard Xavier Newman (DeSoto) and starting wideout R.J. Sneed (Cypress Ranch). Some of them had other offers, some did not.“There are too many kids playing high school football in Texas — there are too many great players — to not recruit well,” Rhule said. “There’s too many players in this state that can go play and play at a high level. So for us, we’re just on a mission to make sure that we do a great job evaluating. You know, I don’t want Drew Brees leaving the state. I don’t want Nick Foles leaving the state. I want to make sure that all these guys that end up playing in the NFL, that we evaluate and we get our arms around.”Rhule gets the credit for building that class, extinguishing the flames and winning those games because, it can be argued, he’s precisely what Baylor needed: an outsider. That was both the quickest and most lasting way to get the Bears past the dark times and into a brighter, more enduring future.This team was the doormat of the Big 12 before Briles, whose wide-open, sideline-to-sideline, up-tempo offense seemed to be the only way to turn a perennial loser into a contender.“But there’s other ways to do it as well,” Rhule said. While the big-play abilities of players like Brewer and Denzel Mims and Tyquan Thornton are still in place, this Baylor team is built on punishing opponents with the Big 12’s most physical defense.As for uniting the fan base, Baylor was largely split between “Coach Art Briles” and “anybody but Coach Art Briles.”“There were pockets of what you’d call ‘Briles people,’” Morris said. “There were people who said (after Briles was fired), ‘I’ll never give you another dime,’ and they may still be there. But Matt has done a great job of getting them back on board, getting Baylor together pulling in the same direction. We’re a small school. We don’t have a lot of alums. So we’ve got to have all our people on the same page pulling in the same direction to start with.”That includes athletic director Mack Rhoades, who hired Rhule in 2016 after unsuccessfully trying to lure him to Missouri in 2015. (“I wasn’t ready to leave Temple at the time,” Rhule said.) When Rhoades finally landed his man in Waco, he knew the rebuild would require patience.He demonstrated that faith and patience earlier this year — with Baylor coming off a 7-6 campaign and starting 2-0 in 2019 — when he extended Rhule’s contract through the 2027 season: essentially a 10-year deal.Said Rhule of the extension: “That contract and the length and terms said, ‘Hey, we believe in what you’re doing and we know that it’s built to last; it’s not just some flash in the pan, that we’re gonna have a sustained period of excellence here.’”For most fan bases, winning solves almost everything. Happy fans and generous boosters aren’t things Rhule outwardly concerns himself with, but he knows the importance of external harmony.In that vein, Rhule said so many in the Waco community were supportive of him and his team — even as they lost.“They would see us in the community,” Rhule said, “even as we were losing, they would see us pick the other team up, they would see us go out there and compete and play our hardest even though we weren’t good enough (to win). And while some people were probably disgruntled, other people were really positive. And that’s why, when I’ve had a chance to leave, I haven’t left. Because that first year, we walked off the field to, I think, three or four standing ovations. Even though we lost. And that’s really special in today’s day and age.”It’s in that community that Baylor football has changed the most. The football team has won the athletic department’s community service award twice already in Rhule’s three seasons. Giving back, he said, is its own reward, and he’s glad his players embrace that.“We’re supposed to be in the business of educating kids,” Rhule said. “I believe, and it’s been well said, that giving is the highest form of living. So our kids are very blessed to be here. They get scholarships and they get tutors and they get clothing and they get gear and they get this and they get that. And there’s an argument out there that they don’t get enough, and that might be true. But they do get a lot. And so, to whom much is given, much is required. And we want them to go out and impact the community. It’s one of the key tenets of our program.” Rhule, a father of three (15-year-old son Bryant frequently attends practice and is on the sideline for games), characterized himself as “a grinder.” But he makes himself and his staff take Thursday nights off during the season so they can enjoy at least a little family time in the midst of that grind.“My son and I are usually watching the college football games. My daughters and I maybe watch a movie because they’re younger,” he said. “But I think we work really hard and there needs to be a time when you can disconnect from the game plan, when you can disconnect from everything and you can just go out and be a dad. That certainly is my first job.“I love the fact that I was named coach of the year, but I’d rather be father of the year first every single year.” When Matt Rhule agreed to become the head football coach at Baylor in 2016, the campus was scorched, the athletic department was smoldering, and the football program was in ashes.He arrived in Waco that December at a university trying to recover from a sexual assault scandal that rocked the campus and saw coach Art Briles, university president Ken Starr and athletic director Ian McCaw lose their jobs. It was clear Rhule’s success wouldn’t be measured by just the on-field product.last_img read more

England’s Emily Taylor wins LET card

first_img10 Dec 2012 England’s Emily Taylor wins LET card England number one Emily Taylor won her Ladies European Tour card in great style when she tied second at the qualifying school in Morocco. Emily was 19-under par for the five-round examination, returning scores of 69, 66, 68, 67, 71. She tied with Nikki Campbell of Australia and they were five shots behind the winner, Ariya Jutanugarn of Thailand. Emily, 18, from Hillside in Lancashire, had also been in great form during the pre-qualifying event, when she led her section on 17-under par. At the end of the final stage she commented: “I didn’t expect this. I did play well in the pre-qualifying but it’s just fantastic to finish tied second, I’m really happy. “I was good with my irons this week, the putting wasn’t great, but tee to green I hit a lot of greens and a lot of fairways so I gave myself a lot of chances. I can’t wait for my rookie year on tour and I’m going to turn pro as soon as possible.” Emily is the winner of the 2012 England Golf women’s order of merit, sponsored by Lorrin Golf. During the season she won the English girls’ championship, the Irish open stroke play title and the Daily Telegraph junior championship. She’ll be joined on Tour by Curtis Cup star Holly Clyburn (Woodhall Spa), who was also among the 30 players who earned their full playing rights for the 2013 season. Holly, who recently turned pro and has already won on the LET Access Series, finished 25th on seven-under par. Her fellow Curtis Cup player, Charley Hull (Woburn) tied 36th on four-under and will eligible for LET membership in Category 9b, with fewer chances to play. According to the LET, she plans to turn professional and, at the age of 16, she will be one of the youngest players on Tour.   England’s Emily leads at LET pre-qualifying 10 December 2012 English girls’ champion Emily Taylor sailed over the first hurdle of the LET Tour School marathon to lead Field A on 17-under par after 72 holes. Emily (Hillside) is among 91 players who graduated to the Final Stage and who include three recent England converts to the professional ranks. They are Holly Clyburn (Woodhall Spa), who was second in Field B on 13-under, while Kelly Tidy (Royal Birkdale) was five-under in Field A, followed by Charlotte Wild (Mere) on three-over. A total of 154 players had entered the First Stage of Pre-Qualifying for the 2013 season, with the majority from Sweden, England and then the USA. The top 45 and ties from each field made it through to the final stage, with the cut falling at six-over par on both courses. This Pre-Qualifying stage will be followed by Final Qualifying from the 13th – 17th December. A 90-hole test now awaits the players, who will play at Amelkis and Al Maaden Golf Resort, Marrakech, from Thursday. Again, the field will play both courses for the first four rounds with a cut to the leading players after 72 holes. The final round, which will determine exemption categories for the 2013 season, will then be played on Al Maaden Golf & Resort Emily Taylor image © Leaderboard Photographylast_img read more

PROSTITUTE GIVEN €1,200 BY JUDGE TO FLY HOME IS BACK WORKING IN DONEGAL

first_imgSPECIAL INVESTIGATION: A prostitute who was part of a group of women given €1,200 by a judge to leave Ireland is back offering her services in Co Donegal, we can reveal.Prostitute Mikeala Niculae, 37 who has returned to Ireland after a Letterkenny court paid for her return home. (North West Newspix)Mikaela Niculae, 37, appeared at a special sitting of Letterkenny District Court in June.She was one of six people who appeared in court in connection with a prostitution ring which was busted by Gardai. Judge Paul Kelly gave four of the prostitutes €1,200 from €5,890 in cash which was seized in the raids on brothels at Riverside Apartments in Letterkenny.Judge Kelly sent the women packing telling their lawyer – “They’re getting a very good deal.”But a Donegal Daily investigation has found that Niculae has been back in Letterkenny for almost two weeks working as a prostitute at an address at Lower Main Street.The cheeky prostitute was one of six people arrested during undercover Gada investigation back in June. The women were sending money back to their countries to support their families, solicitor Patsy Gallagher said.“The fact that €15,000 would build a lovely home back in Romania, a very poor part of the country where they come from, speaks for itself,” said Mr Gallagher.He revealed that with the arrival of the Donegal International Rally into Letterkenny that weekend, they were hoping to be kept very busy.“Of course the weekend that is in it they were hoping to have a bumper weekend with the rally coming up but they are hoping to get out of town as quickly as possible.”But Gardai argued that the women had been overheard saying they planned to return to prostitution. A total of three different apartments in the same complex were raided as part of the planned Garda operation.When they raided the apartments they found a woman in a state of undress and a man in one of the apartments.Another of the prostitutes was hiding in a wardrobe.Detective Sergeant Mick Carroll said all four women had taken out adverts for sexual services on the Escort Ireland website and three phones used on these adverts were seized. He said the women had been in Ireland for a number of months working as prostitutes.After considering the case Judge Kelly ordered the women to return to their country of origin telling the women’s solicitors “They are getting a very good deal.”But just weeks after leaving the country, Mikaela Niculae is back operating from an apartment in Letterkenny.She is again advertising her services in online contacts website Escort Ireland saying which will be in Letterkenny until October 22nd next.At least ten other women are also advertising their services in the contacts website in the Letterkenny area.She has also been observed at the Lower Main Street area of the town.Niculae is offering a wide range of sexual services and even uses the same name and pictures of herself.A Garda spokesman said they are now investigating the situation.“This matter will be looked into as part of the information we have received. We cannot comment any further at this stage,” said the spokesman.PROSTITUTE GIVEN €1,200 BY JUDGE TO FLY HOME IS BACK WORKING IN DONEGAL was last modified: October 20th, 2014 by StephenShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Tags:brothelsdonegalEscort Irelandletterkennyprostitutionlast_img read more

Fall decorations add diversity at Neeley’s Pumpkins

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest Decorative agriculture is big business and can yield big results for farmers. Brian “Dude” Neeley, of Fairfield County, knows this well. In addition to a small cattle operation and growing field corn, soybeans, wheat, hay, and sweet corn on 600 acres, Neeley also plants approximately 25 acres of pumpkins and gourds each year to meet the growing consumer demand for autumn-themed decorations and entertainment.“We started growing pumpkins in 1998,” Neeley said. “It was a different niche market. We were selling sweet corn out of the front yard and already had consumer traffic. The pumpkins just added another attraction. When we started growing pumpkins, people bought pumpkins at the grocery store, but in the past 10 years, fall agri-tourism exploded and we expanded. One of the reasons that it has exploded like it has is that everyone likes to have family fun outdoors and school is back in session. This is one of the last things to do outside before wintry weather hits. And people can do all sorts of things with pumpkins, so there’s pretty much something for everyone — pumpkin painting, carving, catapulting, bowling, and decorating the house and the yard for the season.”While it may not seem like much, 25 acres will yield a lot of pumpkins, and a significant amount of land is required in order to effectively produce pumpkins from year to year.“Twenty-five acres of pumpkins actually takes about 40 acres of land because I leave driveways in between rows in order to make harvest easy and accessible and so I can get farm equipment into the field. You almost need to farm 600 acres to sustain 25 acres of pumpkins. I need at least a three-year rotation before coming back and planting pumpkins in the same place due to the soil-borne diseasesThe autumn sales display on the farm brings customers back each year.associated with low lying crops,” Neeley said. “One year I figured up that we picked 270 tons, or 540,000 pounds of pumpkins. That’s a lot of pumpkin pie, as some people say. But in reality, probably only 1% to 2% of my product goes into food consumption. The rest is decorative.”Neeley sells his pumpkins both wholesale and from a seasonal stand located in his mother, Carola’s, and his late father, David’s, front yard. He estimates that 35% of his sales are retail sales from the stand and that over 40% of his pumpkins are sold wholesale within a 20-mile radius of his farming operation.“Most is being sold locally to various businesses and farms, such as greenhouses with fall entertainment activities and some pumpkin patches that sell 100% of their own product and then come to me to pick up the slack,” Neeley said.Neeley sells some of the pumpkins at produce auction and he said that about 10% of his sales are to out-of-state buyers.“The largest amount of my out-of-state wholesale goes to Paintsville, Kentucky. A guy there takes three or four semi-truck loads a year,” he said. “The guy also wants big 40-pounder cushaw squash. His customers want them to make old family recipes.”And indeed, if folks are looking for a rare or unique variety of pumpkin, gourd, or squash, Neeley is the man to see. The pumpkin patch at harvest time and his seasonal stand are ripe with diversity, as he plants over 60 different varieties.“I plant 1.5 acres of gourds and 3.5 to 4 acres of colored squash. The rest of the acreage is pumpkins. We grow pumpkins from a third of a pound up to 60 pounds, and a couple jumbo varieties that can grow up to 250 pounds. Some have longer stems, some are tall and skinny, some are short and fat. Some are yellow, some are white. We have gourds of all different shapes, colors, and sizes. I grow a very wide variety to appeal to what different consumers like,” Neeley said. “I grow a lot of ‘Touch of Autumn’ pumpkins because they are a nice small pumpkin for school kids to take home and carry. That’s a niche pumpkin I wholesale a lot of because the people I sell to have a lot of school group tours that come in. There’s another one that is white with red veins that looks like a bloodshot eye. It’s called the ‘One-Too-Many;’ it looks like the eyeball of some guy who had one too many last night. There’s one called ‘Snowball’ that looks like a snowball and you’ve got the ‘Peanut Pumpkin’— which actually has a French name — that has growths on it that look like peanut shells.”Neeley begins to prepare for his early summer pumpkin planting the preceding autumn and picks the pumpkins from late summer through Halloween.“I plant rye in the fall after soybean harvest. We mow the rye off and leave it lay for a bed for the pumpkins to grow on and to keep them off the dirt. It keeps them cleaner, retards the weeds, and also holds soil moisture. I plant the first week of June, weather permitting, and do fungus and weed control before harvest. I strive to start picking on Sept. 1, but a couple of times we’ve started at the end of August,” Neeley said.Neeley said that the biggest challenges from a production standpoint are the standard gripes of nearly all farming operations: “Mother Nature, broken down equipment, and getting the pumpkins picked before the deer eat them.”He said the greatest challenge when dealing directly with consumers is “pleasing everyone, having the right, unique item for everyone at the right time. On the other hand, sometimes having too much inventory can be a problem. ‘There’s just too much stuff to choose from, I just don’t know which ones to pick,’ is a comment I get a lot.”To please the buyers, the Neeley family sets up a beautiful seasonal stand. It is meticulously cared for, making it clear that much love, thought, and time have gone into making certain that a trip to Neeley’s Pumpkins and Gourds is a pleasurable family outing.“At our place to sell stuff, we strive to power wash everything before displaying it and have built specially designed display tables to keep pumpkins off the ground in order to keep them clean and put them directly in front of our customers’ faces,” he said. “We also sell mums, corn shocks, and offer three different sizes of straw bales—a tabletop sized bale, a ‘porch’ bale (1/2 bale), and regular bales, in order to attract the market for seasonal decorations.”Sharing a fun experience and providing the consumer and community with nature’s bounty and beauty is something that the Neeley family prides itself on. Neeley’s favorite thing about pumpkin farming is the “enjoyment of fellowship with the consumer and seeing kids — young and old — have fun picking pumpkins at the stand.”Even with all of the pumpkin sales Neeley does, there is still some surplus that he generously donates throughout the community.“We donate a display of some of the best, most unique pumpkins and gourds to our church, where they are displayed throughout the building for Thanksgiving Sunday. We have taken in three pickup loads before and totally decked out the whole church — the sanctuary, the pews, the altar, the fellowship hall. We even had pumpkins in the elevator,” Neeley said.Additionally, some pumpkins are donated to local schools and non-profit business organizations. Of special importance to Neeley is his work with one particular group of students from a local high school.“I donate my time at Sheridan High School with the MRDD class. They have a field trip every year and come out to the pumpkin patch and we harvest pumpkins and I teach them some aspects of pumpkin farming. Then we return to the classroom and decorate the pumpkins in fun, creative ways. I do this toward Halloween at the end of a very long picking season where we pick six to eight hours a day, seven days a week, for 60 days straight. My work with Sheridan High School is what makes all the stress and monotony of the pumpkin harvest worth it,” Neeley said.Those who have worked alongside Neeley and his father throughout the years can attest to their passion for agriculture and their desire to share their knowledge and love of farming with others. The pumpkin business that Neeley runs reflects this strong connection to the land and his community.Follow Neeley Farms on Facebook for updates and visit the pumpkin stand at 2574 Mudhouse Road outside of Lancaster to see and appreciate the impressive fruits of Neeley’s labor.For more visit www.neeleyfarms.com.last_img read more

Bucks get Bledsoe from Suns for Monroe, 2 draft picks

first_imgBledsoe, who wanted out of Phoenix, was traded to the Bucks on Tuesday in exchange for big man Greg Monroe and two 2018 draft picks.The 27-year-old Bledsoe had not been with the Suns since Oct. 22, when he posted “I Don’t wanna be here” on Twitter, the same day the Suns fired coach Earl Watson. He had been averaging 15.7 points per game, second behind Devin Booker, and was the team’s on-court leader.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSWATCH: Drones light up sky in final leg of SEA Games torch runSPORTSSEA Games: Philippines picks up 1st win in men’s water poloSPORTSMalditas save PH from shutoutHe was sent home by the Suns after the tweet, reducing the team’s leverage because everyone in the league knew Phoenix was trying to trade him. Bledsoe had asked to be traded before the season, Suns general manager Ryan McDonough has said. The NBA fined the eight-year NBA veteran $10,000 for the tweet.Adding Bledsoe will take some of the focus off Antetokounmpo, the Bucks’ primary ball-handler. Milwaukee had lost four of its last five games before visiting the Cavaliers, but adding Bledsoe’s scoring ability alongside Antetokounmpo and Khris Middleton on a team that also includes rising guard Malcolm Brogdon could help. LATEST STORIES QC cops nab robbery gang leader, cohort John Lloyd Cruz a dashing guest at Vhong Navarro’s wedding Brace for potentially devastating typhoon approaching PH – NDRRMC Olympic marathon champion Sumgong banned 4 years for EPO Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Kammuri turning to super typhoon less likely but possible — Pagasa Typhoon Kammuri accelerates, gains strength en route to PH “We’re excited. Eric’s excited,” Bucks coach Jason Kidd said in Cleveland.Bledsoe will take his physical on Wednesday and is expected to join the Bucks in San Antonio in time for Thursday’s game against the Spurs.Middleton can’t wait to see what Bledsoe brings.“He’ll be another great player for us, a guy who can create for others and create for himself on offense,” Middleton said. “I’m excited to play with him. We can do a lot of things. We’ll have more ball-handlers on the court at the same time. He’s going to be a great for us.”Already a dangerous and up-and-coming team, the Bucks could go to another level with Bledsoe.ADVERTISEMENT View comments Stronger peso trims PH debt value to P7.9 trillion CPP denies ‘Ka Diego’ arrest caused ‘mass panic’ among S. Tagalog NPA Read Next Giannis Antetokounmpo powers Bucks in bounce back win over Celtics PLAY LIST 02:29Giannis Antetokounmpo powers Bucks in bounce back win over Celtics00:50Trending Articles00:50Trending Articles01:37Protesters burn down Iran consulate in Najaf01:47Panelo casts doubts on Robredo’s drug war ‘discoveries’01:29Police teams find crossbows, bows in HK university01:35Panelo suggests discounted SEA Games tickets for students02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games “He adds a veteran point guard, a guy who plays with pace and can get into the paint, can make the right play,” Cavs coach Tyronn Lue said. “He’s been on the cusp of being an All-Star the last three years. He brings a different dimension to their team. He can shoot the basketball, get in the paint, run pick-and-roll and he’s a good defender also.“It’s a good pickup for them.”Bledsoe averaged more than 20 points and six assists per game in each of the last two seasons with the Suns, including career highs in points (21.1) and assists (6.3) last season. Bledsoe spent the past five seasons in Phoenix after his first three years with the Clippers.The 27-year-old Monroe, who joined the team as a free agent in 2015 after five years in Detroit, has been sidelined recently because of a left calf strain. Over three seasons with the Bucks, he averaged 13.3 points, 7.6 rebounds and 2.2 assists over 165 games.Without him, Milwaukee will likely consolidate the center position and look ahead to early next year, when the front line should get a boost with the return of injured forward Jabari Parker.The 6-foot-11 Monroe has an expiring contract, which means even more room for a Suns team with loads of cap space. They also could have as many as three first-round picks next season.“Moose did everything we asked him to help us win, from being a starter to being asked to go to the bench and help us have a stronger bench,” Kidd said. “I wish him the best because he did everything we asked.”Milwaukee’s first-round pick will belong to the Suns in 2018 if in the range of 11-16 overall; in 2019 if in the range of 4-16; in 2020 if in the range of 8-30; and in 2021 it will be unprotected. The Suns get Milwaukee’s second-round pick next year if in the range of 48-60 overall.Phoenix, rebuilding with an extremely young roster featuring Booker and T.J. Warren, has not made the playoffs in six years. MOST READ FILE – At left, in a March 6, 2017, file photo, Milwaukee Bucks’ Greg Monroe (15) shoots during an NBA basketball game against the Philadelphia 76ers, in Philadelphia. At right, in a March 12, 2017, file photo, Phoenix Suns guard Eric Bledsoe (2) shoots over a Portland Trail Blazers defender during an NBA basketball game, in Phoenix. A person with knowledge of the deal says the Phoenix Suns have agreed to trade disgruntled guard Eric Bledsoe to the Milwaukee Bucks for big man Greg Monroe and two 2018 draft picks. The deal includes a protected first-round and a protected second-round draft pick, according to the person who spoke Tuesday, Nov. 7, 2017, on condition of anonymity because the trade first reported by ESPN had not yet been finalized.(AP Photo/File)MILWAUKEE — Eric Bledsoe’s disgruntled days are over.The talented guard is getting a fresh start with the Milwaukee Bucks, who have another proven scorer to take some pressure off All-Star Giannis Antetokounmpo.ADVERTISEMENT Japan ex-PM Nakasone who boosted ties with US dies at 101last_img read more

a month ago​Rodgers: Maddison still an injury doubt for Leicester recall

first_imgTagsPremiership NewsAbout the authorIan FerrisShare the loveHave your say ​Rodgers: Maddison still an injury doubt for Leicester recallby Ian Ferrisa month agoSend to a friendShare the loveLeicester boss Brendan Rodgers has been giving the latest update on the injured James Maddison.”We’ll see over the next couple of days. He’s obviously going to be a doubt. He’s put some weight on his ankle so we’ll see over the coming days.”He’s a big talent and he’s been playing great. We’ve got a really strong squad. We made some changes in the week, and the rhythm, speed and intensity in the team was the same.”It’s just the risk of whether he’s going to last the game or not. It’s questionable whether he’ll play or not. He’s such a talented player, we’ll give him every chance.” last_img read more

a day agoWatford injury chief unsure of Welbeck prognosis

first_imgWatford injury chief unsure of Welbeck prognosisby Freddie Taylora day agoSend to a friendShare the loveWatford’s head of injury prevention and rehabilitation Alberto Leon says the club are waiting on a prognosis for Danny Welbeck’s ankle injury.The striker lasted only a few minutes before being substituted during last Saturday’s draw with Watford”We are waiting on the report from one of the specialists,” said Leon.”We did a first report and it’s not the best news but we are waiting for this opinion. We will decide in a few days what we are going to do with the rehab.” About the authorFreddie TaylorShare the loveHave your saylast_img read more

NewsAlert Canadas Duhamel Radford win Olympic bronze in pairs

first_imgPYEONGCHANG, South Korea – Canada’s Meagan Duhamel and Eric Radford have won a bronze medal in pairs figure skating at the Pyeongchang Olympics.The two-time world champions, who are competing in their final season, scored 153.33 points for their program to Adele’s “Hometown Glory,” and 230.15 total points.Germany’s Aliona Savchenko and Bruno Massot, who started the day just 0.23 points behind the Canadians, won gold with 235.90 while reigning world champions Sui Wenging and Han Cong of China took silver with 235.47.Evgenia Tarasova and Vladimir Morozov, representing Russia, were second after Wednesday’s short program but fell to fourth place Thursday.Duhamel and Radford were third after the short program, five-and-a-half points behind the leaders.last_img read more

Worried your presale condo might be cancelled Research the developer first

first_imgTORONTO – With a sigh and hesitant pause, Jason Paris confides that in retrospect he wishes he’d done more research before putting down a deposit on the now defunct Museum FLTS condominium project in Toronto’s trendy Lower Junction area.The 43-year-old television production manager is one of hundreds of would-be homeowners who recently had their money returned and dreams dashed when the building’s developer, Castlepoint Numa, cited lengthy delays obtaining the necessary approvals, building permits and financing, as reasons for the halt.“If I had the knowledge I have now, then, I definitely would have researched Castlepoint further,” said Paris, who subsequently found out that the developer did the same thing to other hopeful Toronto condo buyers a few years ago when another one its projects fell through.While Castlepoint Numa said it’s giving original Museum FLTS buyers the first opportunity and a discount on the next residential phase of its greater Lower Junction neighbourhood project, Paris points out that some buyers have been burned twice in a row by the same developer.The best line of defence for prospective presale condo buyers seeking to mitigate any potential fallout is to do the appropriate due diligence on the developer before signing any contracts, experts say.Unfortunately, there’s not much that can be done to protect Paris and others like him who become the victims of a cancelled condo complex, said Vancouver real estate lawyer Richard Bell.“It does happen in various scenarios, particularly if there’s a significant downturn in a market over a short period of time. So really, people are at risk,” said Bell, who works for law firm Bell Alliance.The bottom line? Do your homework, Bell said.“Who is the developer? What have they built previously? A new developer entering the market place is going to greater risk in a situation for a buyer than having a very experience developer in the market place.”The key advantage of using seasoned developers is that they have a name and brand to protect, notes Toronto real estate lawyer Mark Weisleder.“I have heard of situations where the builders have cancelled the deal and then turned around and then resold units at a $100,000 more each, and there’s virtually nothing that the original owners could do because there were lots of clauses in the contracts that allowed builders to cancel,” said Weisleder.“But you will find that reputable people, people who have been around a long time, they don’t do that. When they plan a development and plan units, they’re expected to complete. They price accordingly and they complete.”Keep in mind, Weisleder added, that even in Toronto’s increasingly competitive condo market — where the average selling price for a unit is about $523,000 — approximately 95 to 97 per cent of developments will see completion. According to real estate consultancy Urbanation, 23 condo projects have been cancelled in the city since 2012 — five of them in the last year.Bell said that the last time he’d heard of a cancelled condo development in Vancouver was in 2008, during the financial crisis.Jason Paris believes he is luckier than some because he only got involved with the cancelled condo project in February, when he signed a contract and handed over his deposit.“Some people had their investment off the market for a year and a half. I’m off the market for nine months,” he said.“But in a crazy property market like Toronto, those nine months are really going to make a huge a difference on what I can afford going forward.”Follow @DaveHTO on Twitter.last_img read more