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Disability Resource Office supports Saint Mary’s students

first_imgEditor’s note: This is the second day in a series on disability at Notre Dame and Saint Mary’s. Today’s stories examine the services available to students at the University and the College.Saint Mary’s created the Disabilities Resource Office (DRO) in 2004 to provide students with access to accommodations granted under the Americans with Disabilities Act, director Iris Giamo said. Prior to the creation of the office, associate dean Susan Vanek worked with students to ensure they received the accommodations they needed.Giamo said there are three prongs of disability that the office serves including “learning, chronic medical and psychiatric disabilities.”Eric Richelsen | The Observer Students with disease vary from serious asthma, Crohn’s disease, irritable bowel syndrome and immunological diseases, she said. Learning disabilities include dyslexia, dyscalculia, executive function and attention disorders. Psychiatric disabilities include anxiety disorders, bipolar, Asperger’s and others.Students must register with the DRO to receive accommodations, which are reviewed on a case-by-case basis, Giamo said.Students eligible for educational accommodations might receive extended time and reduced-distraction room, note-takers and print materials in alternate formats — electronic and audio.Giamo said the DRO provides students access for what they need under the law and any grade they earn is a result of hard work.“We consider the established history, self-report and third party documentation and evaluations,” she said. “Saint Mary’s is a small campus, and it spreads responsibility for compliance with disability protections to each member in our community.”Giamo said her office teaches students to be independent and learn to advocate for themselves.“The office empowers students,” she said. “Disabled students may need extra time to show mastery of a subject, and it’s essential that they have access to curriculum.”Giamo said Saint Mary’s has attracted several students with physical disabilities over the years, but this fall the College will welcome the first student in a wheelchair in at least 12 years.The DRO works closely with Residence Life and Facilities staff to provide the physical access needed and updates in adherence to legal architectural guidelines are made when necessary, Giamo said.Giamo said ADA has increased the number of students that can attend college.“Eight percent of the student population at Saint Mary’s identifies as having a disability,” she said. “Only 75 percent of that eight percent use their accommodation.”According to Giamo, the reason only 75 percent of students may use their accommodations is because many students learn to compensate or may not need it for a certain classes.Many practitioners in the field think the number is close to 10 percent nationally, Giamo said.Equal access for people with disabilities is part of civil rights and for this reason professors are required to include information about the DRO on their syllabi, Giamo said.“This has definitely raised the profile of the office and allowed students to address what they might need,” she said. “We have an exceptional faculty here and not only for students with disabilities”Giamo said it is crucial for students to share their concerns about accessibility and accommodations with the College and the DRO.“It is only when people write or talk about it that we can deal with these issues.”Other resources for students with disabilities include Office for Student Success to assist students with their academic careers.Giamo said the Office promotes academic skills and healthy study habits for students with and without disabilities. There are also volunteer tutors in each department as well as tutors in the Writing Center to help students succeed.She said there is a heightened awareness especially with the emerging field of disability studies and theory.“There’s a saying in the field that ‘anyone at any time can become disabled,’” Giamo said.Tags: ADA, Disabilities Resource Office, disability, DRO, saint mary’slast_img read more

Pongetti adjusts to Syracuse’s style of play, midfield

first_img Published on September 16, 2014 at 12:03 am Contact Chris: cjlibona@syr.edu | @ChrisLibonati Another year, another campus, another team.Last year, Rebecca Pongetti started her freshman year of college at Louisiana State, starting 11 and playing in 18 of the Tigers’ 20 games. But just a few months before this season began, she transferred to Syracuse, preferring the Orange’s quicker, possession-based style of play.“I got the opportunity with Syracuse and I took it and I didn’t look back,” she said.Pongetti described her start at Syracuse as “frantic.” LSU was something she had planned in advance when she committed in 10th grade. But SU was a little more unexpected.As she switches from what she called LSU’s “kick-and-run” style to the Orange’s more patient, purposeful passing, she’s rotating into more playing time and a new position because of Hanna Strong’s indefinite suspension from the team.AdvertisementThis is placeholder text“The speed of play in the (Atlantic Coast Conference) is a little quicker than it is in the (Southeastern Conference),” head coach Phil Wheddon said. “The SEC is a big, physical game and the ACC is a quicker game.”Pongetti has settled in, but the transition is ongoing. After starting the first three games of the season, Pongetti did not play against Connecticut on Sept. 1 as Wheddon said Strong was better suited for the matchup.But the team will be without Strong indefinitely. She was suspended Sept. 6 after she was recorded using racist and homophobic language. Strong plays holding midfielder, the same position as Pongetti.Strong’s suspension may help Pongetti get more time on the field. Her absence opens a rotational gap at the holding midfielder position in Syracuse’s 3-5-2 formation. Strong played more than 30 minutes in four of Syracuse’s first five games. Now, the Orange will have to find someone else to play those minutes.“(Pongetti) still working on her speed of play, taking a quicker first touch so she can play more quickly,” Wheddon said.She’s also working out of a new position. Pongetti’s played center back since she started playing with the Canadian Youth National Team in her mid-early teens years, but when she arrived at Syracuse, she was shifted to midfield.Switching from center back to the midfield made it clear to Pongetti that her work was cut out for her. She had to build her stamina to physically prepare herself for playing in the midfield and adjusting to the new playing style that came with transfer.“This summer I worked every single day.” Pongetti said. “I ran, I lifted — I did everything I could to be possibly fit for the midfield.”As a freshman at LSU, Pongetti had to prove herself. This year is no different.Maddie Iozzi, a sophomore defender, said that Pongetti has continued to improve since she arrived. Iozzi could see it better than most — the two played together on the Canadian Youth National Team.Said Iozzi: “She was a bit timid at first, but now she’s zipping (passes) in there and she’s gotten a lot better from when she first came.” Comments Facebook Twitter Google+last_img read more

Kotoko deny reports about Danish coach recruitment

first_imgThe management of Kotoko has denied reports that a foreign coach, Thomas Muller is in the country and he is set to be named as Technical Director of the club.Some media reports have since Friday linked the coach, who was spotted with a board member of the club at the Kumasi Airport to Kotoko. But speaking in an interview with the club’s website, Communications Manager of the Kumasi giants, Kwaku Ahenkorah was emphatic that, the foreign trainer has nothing to do with Kotoko.“Those reports are far from the truth. We didn’t bring him and he’s also not here because of Kotoko. As far as we know, Dr. Kwaku Frimpong of Champion Divine Clinic brought him. They are business partners. Therefore reports about the coach coming to Kotoko should be ignored” said the club’s spokesman.However, the club’s management added that they have no such intention and that, those reports shouldn’t be given any attention.–Follow Joy Sports on Twitter: @Joy997FM. Our hashtag is #JoySportslast_img read more