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Student assault victim shares experience

first_imgThe Justice Education Department at Saint Mary’s began its “Week Against Violence” on Tuesday night in the Student Center with the discussion “Beyond the Violence,” led by Saint Mary’s junior Jessica Richmond, who discussed her personal account of violence.“Authenticity requires vulnerability, courage and integrity,” Richmond said, adding that she lives by these words.Richmond shared her story of physical and sexual assault to offer perspective and advice to her peers as fellow victims and friends of victims.Allison D’Ambrosia “People see vulnerability as being weak,” she said “But I build my life around viewing vulnerability as a strength ⎯ being open to having conversations like these, airing my dirty laundry, as I like to say.”Although Richmond openly shared her personal encounter with violence, she said she was once much more reluctant to speak about the horrific experience.“There are very few people in my life that knew what happened and to the great detail of what happened,” she said.Richmond, who shared her story with her father this past weekend, said her parents’ reactions to the events were why she did not want to tell them in the first place. Richmond said that upon hearing of her attack, her mother misdirected her frustration toward her daughter. She said her mother’s strong reaction made her more cautious about delving into details.“I almost felt as if there was resentment towards me for not telling her sooner,” Richmond said. “My mom immediately jumped to ‘What did he do to you?’ and being a victim, I recommend you never do that to someone because that instantly put me on the defensive. I didn’t want to tell her.”Richmond said many people, including her mother, have asked her why she did not report her attack.“I’m not trying to play into being young because I think there are many younger women that are stronger than I was [who are also] assaulted, but I was so scared,” she said. “I was so alone. I had no idea [of] the resources out there. I had no idea what to do. I was scared of him.”This fear lies in the systemic sexism of the United States’ judicial system, Richmond said.“Men have a power and an authority in society, and there’s a lot that goes into that,” Richmond said. “But he scared me to death. Even after knowing he no longer worked with me, he didn’t live near me, he terrified me.”Richmond said her decision to keep the attack private was an act of self-preservation.“It was the thought of going to the police and saying I wanted to press charges when there was no evidence and when no one knew about what had happened,” Richmond said. “I didn’t want to air my dirty laundry for the whole world to have him get a slap on the wrist.“I didn’t want to have to tell my story a thousand times only to be told ‘Well, there’s nothing we can do.’”Richmond said she also feared it would become a “he said, she said” situation, or she would be condemned for not explicitly saying “no.”“Life went on,” she said. “I didn’t report it. That is the one thing I come back to most often. Maybe I should have. Maybe if I called him to justice, it could have gone in my favor. I find myself still sort of switching a little bit, but I don’t regret not reporting.”Richmond said her decision not to report might not be the best choice for all other victims of violence. Each person should make an individual choice.“Do I think [other victims] should?” Richmond said. “Yes, because there’s a great chance [they] can get something out of it, but I think for my health I couldn’t. This is not ‘Law and Order.’ Due process doesn’t happen in 45 minutes.”Richmond said she attributes much of her growth since the attack to her boyfriend of three-and-a-half years.“He’s my support system,” she said. “It’s kind of strange because he’s a man, he’s six-foot-seven and almost three hundred pounds. He is my version of empowerment.”Richmond said her boyfriend and his sensitivity played key roles in her ability to heal.“I found that when we first started dating I had all sorts of triggers,” she said. “ A certain smell would throw me into a hysterical crying fit, a certain way of being touched, a certain playful comment. Sometimes it wasn’t the words that were being said; it was just the tone it was said in.“I can’t have my neck touched. That is like my one thing that will put me in a fetal position crying.”As a victim of violence, Richmond said it is amazing to have someone there to say, “Okay, that’s completely fine. I respect you for that.”“Once I got to that point, I became offended when people used tamer words because it’s oppressive,” she said. “Don’t be afraid of using the terms. Don’t be afraid to say, ‘She was raped.’”Richmond said that in spite of having a solid and healthy relationship with her boyfriend now, if she could go back in time she would tell her high school self that she did not need a man.“We’re women at such an amazing school with such an empowering philosophy that we can do anything,” she said. “I don’t want someone to stand in front of me.“That’s what’s great about [my] relationship now. [My boyfriend] stands behind me pushing me forward.”Adrienne Lyles-Chockley, head of the Justice Education Department, ended the discussion by offering Richmond affirmations on behalf of the audience.“This is such a gift and a refreshingly honest dialogue, so I want to affirm this and affirm you,” Lyles-Chockley said.The Justice Education professor said she also supported Richmond’s decision to not go to the police.“I’d also just like to affirm your choice not to report,” Lyles-Chockley said. “I appreciate that part of giving the person that was raped or assaulted control [means] granting them control of what happens next. So we support women by listening and helping according to their individual needs. Friends often don’t understand, and it’s just not that simple.”As a continuation of the “Week against Violence,” Saint Mary’s will host a panel presentation on community responses to violence against women, titled “Justice and the Victims: Beyond Law and Order,” on Thursday night at 7 p.m. in the Vander Vennet Theater. Tags: Justice Education Department, sexual assault, Week Against Violencelast_img read more

DAPD to hold annual Dollar Day tomorrow

first_imgImage via: commissaries.comThe Dominica Association of Persons with Disabilities (DAPD Inc.) will tomorrow hold its 6th Annual National Dollar Day under the theme for which is “Ensuring our Future: Maintaining our Relevance with Dominica’s Support”. Dollar Day is DAPD Inc.’s way of mobilizing financial support at the national level to complement funds which are donated from external agencies. This year the association through its Executive Director Nathalie Murphy is making a special appeal to the general public to support their Dollar Day initiative particularly since their headquarters has been burglarized twice within two months.“We make a “special” appeal to Corporate Citizens, Embassies, Faith Based Organizations, Professionals in various fields of endeavours, Educational Institutions, Local Government Authorities, Politicians, Government Departments, Visitors, Men, Women and children across the length and breadth of Dominica and citizens from all walks of life to contribute towards this venture”. Five desktop computers DELL OPTIPLEX 760, five monitors DELL 170FPVt, two keyboards and two mouse Equipment valued at over $20,000.00 were reported stolen on 28th July, 2011; which had been donated by the Japanese Government in 2009.The contributions can be mailed or delivered to the association’s headquarters in Goodwill, Roseau. Dominica Association of Persons with DisabilitiesCanal Lane, GoodwillP. O. Box 2359RoseauCommonwealth of Dominica Dominica Vibes News 18 Views   no discussions LocalNews DAPD to hold annual Dollar Day tomorrow by: – October 27, 2011 Share Tweetcenter_img Sharing is caring! Share Sharelast_img read more

Superintendent Suggests Not Renewing Principal’s Contract Over Holocaust Remarks

first_imgPalm Beach County School Superintendent Donald Fennoy spoke out Wednesday afternoon about the former Spanish River High School principal who made controversial comments about the Holocaust.Fennoy recommends that William Latson’s district contract not be renewed. That statement came after an email Latson sent to a parent surfaced, in which he reportedly wrote, “I can’t say the Holocaust is a factual, historical event because I am not in a position to do so as a school district employee.”According to the district, Latson made a “grave error in judgement.”Latson says that his words were misconstrued.Upon being removed from his position on Tuesday, he wrote to school staff members, “I have been reassigned to the district office due to a statement that was not accurately relayed to the newspaper by one of our parents.” In addition, “It is unfortunate that someone can make a false statement and do so anonymously and it holds credibility, but that is the world we live in.”Click here to watch Fennoy’s full video statement.Will Former Boca Principal Lose his Job Today Over Holocaust Controversy?last_img read more