• Home
  • Tag: 南京现在有活的场子

Senate discusses sexual assault, recognition of Native American history

first_imgNotre Dame student senators focused on social justice issues during their meeting Monday evening, addressing the University’s policies regarding the treatment of sexual assault survivors and Native Americans.Over the past several weeks, the student senate discussed the Trump administration’s changes to Title IX, the federal civil rights law that regulates how colleges handle sexual assault allegations. Many student leaders have expressed concerns that Notre Dame will be less responsive to victims’ needs in the wake of these new changes.Student Title IX services manager Amber Monroe spoke to the senate about the University’s sexual assault resolution process and addressed concerns about new Title IX revisions.“A lot of these [changes] are not mandates. … We’re going to be given a lot of time to figure out what [the changes] look like for Notre Dame,” Monroe said. “What I can say is we will always be Notre Dame in the sense of caring for our students.”The proposed changes to Title IX allow colleges to resolve sexual assault allegations through mediation, a process in which victims and perpetrators discuss the allegations face-to-face. Monroe clarified that Notre Dame does not plan on using this kind of face-to-face mediation for sexual assault cases.But the University does offer other “alternative resolution” processes for sexual assault cases on a voluntary basis, she said. Victims can agree to engage in these processes, which are supposed to be forms of restorative justice — a way to help victims and perpetrators heal together. “I think that we forget sometimes that these are people,” Monroe said. “Emotions, behaviors and choices affect how these processes can metastasize and what they can look like for each individual.”Monroe explained that the University developed these alternative resolution strategies in response to student feedback. Many students noted in the 2016 Campus Climate Survey that they felt their options for resolving incidents of assault were too limited. Notably, these alternative resolution processes — unlike traditional administrative resolution processes — are non-disciplinary, meaning perpetrators cannot face disciplinary action after an alternative resolution is completed.Junior and Welsh Family Hall senator Lindsay McCray said a non-disciplinary resolution could endanger students.“There have been studies that indicate that the majority of sexual assaults are committed by repeat offenders,” she said. “So, in allowing [an] alternative resolution to occur in sexual assault cases, even if it’s not mediation, how does that protect the student body at all from rapists?”Monroe said the University considers each case individually and does not allow alternative resolutions for perpetrators who could pose serious threats to other students.After concluding the discussion of Title IX, senators shifted the conversation to Native American history and culture.Senators approved a resolution calling the University administration to recognize that Notre Dame’s campus sits on land that once belonged to the Potawatomi people. The resolution encouraged a statement acknowledging this history be featured at Welcome Weekend, graduation and the Walk the Walk Week luncheon.Additionally, the senate approved a resolution calling for a Native Studies minor in the College of Arts and Letters, drawing on the example of many other universities.“This … shows the people who are Native descendants that we respect you, we affirm you,” said Marcus Winchester-Jones, sophomore and president of the Native American Student Association of Notre Dame. “It … makes it so it’s a more welcoming community for everybody.”Tags: Native American Student Association of Notre Dame, Notre Dame Student Senate, Title IX, Title IX policylast_img read more

Strong strawberries

first_imgBy Sharon DowdyUniversity of GeorgiaGeorgia’s strawberry crop wasn’t damaged much by the recent cold snap and snowfall that hit the state’s midsection. Strawberry blooms can withstand cold temperatures because of plant genetics and farmer action.“The plants are making new flowers right now and will continue to do so until late spring,” said Gerard Krewer, a University of Georgia Cooperative Extension horticulturist. “They aren’t like peaches and blueberries where the flower buds are all formed in the fall.” Protected by iceThe recent snowfall didn’t hurt the flowers. To protect strawberry plants from cold weather, farmers cover them with an ice-water mixture, creating an ice blanket of sorts, he said. Ice forms at 32 degrees, but strawberry blossoms don’t freeze until 28 degrees.“The overhead irrigation coats the plants with ice and if you keep the sprinklers running, the ice freezes and releases heat to protect the blossoms,” Krewer said. The method worked for Ron Hayes. The certified public accountant grows two acres of pick-your-own strawberries in Canon, Ga. “I only had a few blooms, and the snow just formed a blanket on them,” he said. Even if a cold snap did wipe out all the early flowers, strawberry plants continue to produce more side branches and more flowers, Krewer said. Georgia plants, which typically come in the fall from Northern states and Canada, already have a few flowers in the mother crowns when they arrive.Growers all across GeorgiaThere are roughly 65 strawberry producers in Georgia, totaling about 300 acres in production. Unlike blueberries, which are grown extensively in the southeast and south-central parts of the state, strawberry production is spread over the state. Most growers sell berries through pick-your-own operations or local sales. “It’s more profitable for our growers to focus on producing fresh vine-ripe strawberries,” said Krewer. “Our growers don’t need to compete with the 800-pound gorilla otherwise known as California.”Like tomatoes, vine-ripe is bestWhen it comes to taste, Krewer likens strawberries to tomatoes and peaches. “They will turn red if picked on the green side, but a vine-ripe strawberry is a superior product,” he said. “When you’re in the field, push back the plant’s leaves and you’ll find succulent berries tucked under the canopy.”Growers in the Savannah area are already harvesting berries. Growers in north Georgia, like Hayes, will harvest in mid-April or early May and finish in June. A trip to a u-pick farm is a great family outing, Hayes said.“It’s a good little adventure to bring your kids out to,” he said. “Whether they are four years old or 12 years old, they love it.”For a list of pick-your-own strawberry farms, see the Southern Region Small Fruit Consortium Web site atwww.smallfruits.org/Strawberries/Marketing.htm. Or, go the Georgia Strawberry Growers Web site at www.gastrawberries.org.last_img read more

US pollies eye porn-block on new computers

first_imgNews.com.au 21 December 2016Computers and devices sold in South Carolina that can access the internet would be required to have filters installed to prevent people from viewing pornography, although buyers could pay a $US20 ($A28) fee to remove the blocking software under a proposal before the legislature.The amendment would require manufacturers or sellers of computers and internet-accessible devices to install software that blocks pornography, according to a draft of the amendment filed with the South Carolina General Assembly on December 15.One of its sponsors said on Tuesday the amendment would help raise money for the state’s task force to combat human trafficking, adding that the measure would not restrict their legal liberties, indicating it would allow for viewing adult pornography.“This is a way to preserve freedom, not raise taxes and combat a serious problem all in one,” State Representative William “Bill” Chumley, a Republican, said in an interview.Buyers over 18 in South Carolina would have to pay a $US20 fee to have the block removed. Manufacturers or sellers would pay a $US20 opt-out fee for each computer or device sold so they didn’t have to install the blocking software, according to the proposed measure.The amendment did not address any technology challenges or whether the filter would be a barrier to interstate commerce for technology firms that sell their devices nationwide.READ MORE: http://www.news.com.au/world/breaking-news/us-pollies-eye-pornblock-on-new-computers/news-story/30469d7c13e508f8378b18311aa0434dKeep up with family issues in NZ. Receive our weekly emails direct to your Inbox.last_img read more

Engines roar on The Fourth at Cottage Grove

first_imgIn the debut for Mach-1 Sport Compacts, Chloe Van Sandt worked her way to the lead on the initial start and stayed there until lap three, when Barry Cannon made his way past. Defending Shaw Race Cars Western region champion Bricen James was the runner-up while Steven Sturdevant got third.   Shawn Hand was quick in the early stages of the Karl Kustoms Northern SportMod race.  The Springfield chauffeur led the first two trips past the flag stand before being overtaken by Art Hiatt, who then blazed the trail the balance of the distance. Campos seized the initial lead over the rest of the field, slowed only by three stoppages, and 0n each restart he managed to keep back all contenders to lead the distance for his first feature win of 2020.  COTTAGE GROVE, Ore. (July 4) – The roar of the engines returned to Cottage Grove Speedway for the Fourth of July and John Campos took care of business in the much-anticipated IMCA Modified main event. By Ben Deatherage Doug Coffman got second with David Schmidt behind him in third.  John Campos collected the July 4 season-opening IMCA Modified checkers at Cottage Grove Speedway. (Photo courtesy of JRP Racing Photos) Cannon remained the leader until the 13th trip to the line when Cole Trissell passed him.  Trissell, went unchallenged the rest of the way to win the main event. Chris Lemon got second while Van Sandt was third.last_img read more