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Disability Resource Office supports Saint Mary’s students

first_imgEditor’s note: This is the second day in a series on disability at Notre Dame and Saint Mary’s. Today’s stories examine the services available to students at the University and the College.Saint Mary’s created the Disabilities Resource Office (DRO) in 2004 to provide students with access to accommodations granted under the Americans with Disabilities Act, director Iris Giamo said. Prior to the creation of the office, associate dean Susan Vanek worked with students to ensure they received the accommodations they needed.Giamo said there are three prongs of disability that the office serves including “learning, chronic medical and psychiatric disabilities.”Eric Richelsen | The Observer Students with disease vary from serious asthma, Crohn’s disease, irritable bowel syndrome and immunological diseases, she said. Learning disabilities include dyslexia, dyscalculia, executive function and attention disorders. Psychiatric disabilities include anxiety disorders, bipolar, Asperger’s and others.Students must register with the DRO to receive accommodations, which are reviewed on a case-by-case basis, Giamo said.Students eligible for educational accommodations might receive extended time and reduced-distraction room, note-takers and print materials in alternate formats — electronic and audio.Giamo said the DRO provides students access for what they need under the law and any grade they earn is a result of hard work.“We consider the established history, self-report and third party documentation and evaluations,” she said. “Saint Mary’s is a small campus, and it spreads responsibility for compliance with disability protections to each member in our community.”Giamo said her office teaches students to be independent and learn to advocate for themselves.“The office empowers students,” she said. “Disabled students may need extra time to show mastery of a subject, and it’s essential that they have access to curriculum.”Giamo said Saint Mary’s has attracted several students with physical disabilities over the years, but this fall the College will welcome the first student in a wheelchair in at least 12 years.The DRO works closely with Residence Life and Facilities staff to provide the physical access needed and updates in adherence to legal architectural guidelines are made when necessary, Giamo said.Giamo said ADA has increased the number of students that can attend college.“Eight percent of the student population at Saint Mary’s identifies as having a disability,” she said. “Only 75 percent of that eight percent use their accommodation.”According to Giamo, the reason only 75 percent of students may use their accommodations is because many students learn to compensate or may not need it for a certain classes.Many practitioners in the field think the number is close to 10 percent nationally, Giamo said.Equal access for people with disabilities is part of civil rights and for this reason professors are required to include information about the DRO on their syllabi, Giamo said.“This has definitely raised the profile of the office and allowed students to address what they might need,” she said. “We have an exceptional faculty here and not only for students with disabilities”Giamo said it is crucial for students to share their concerns about accessibility and accommodations with the College and the DRO.“It is only when people write or talk about it that we can deal with these issues.”Other resources for students with disabilities include Office for Student Success to assist students with their academic careers.Giamo said the Office promotes academic skills and healthy study habits for students with and without disabilities. There are also volunteer tutors in each department as well as tutors in the Writing Center to help students succeed.She said there is a heightened awareness especially with the emerging field of disability studies and theory.“There’s a saying in the field that ‘anyone at any time can become disabled,’” Giamo said.Tags: ADA, Disabilities Resource Office, disability, DRO, saint mary’slast_img read more

Tangier city residents in Morocco hold demonstrations over high utility prices

first_imgResidents in Morocco’s northern city of Tangier are protesting over high prices for water and electricity.This is after authorities and the company running the services proposed measures to calm unrest against what protesters see as high prices and administrative mismanagement.Water, waste water and electricity businesses in the cities of Tangier and neighboring Tetouan have since 2002 been operated by Amendis.That’s an affiliate of France’s Veolia Environment.Redal, another Veolia subsidiary is operating in the capital Rabat.The protesters believe services would improve if a public company takes over.Many cafes and stores in the city switched off their lights and lit candles in support of the protest.last_img read more

Frances Batta

first_imgFrances Batta, 88, of St. Leon, Indiana passed Friday, May 25, 2018. She leaves her beloved children: Jerry (Jackie) Batta of Logan, IN, Donna Batta of Florence, KY, Paul Batta of Sunman, IN, Tony (Janet) Batta of Sunman, IN, Elaine (Ricardo) Walker of Bright, IN, Janet (David) Baur of Ft. Myers, FL and Joe Batta Ft. Myers , FL. She also leaves behind 8 grandchildren and 13 great grandchildren.Frances was preceded in death by her husband of 38 years, Raymond, and their son Robert.Frances and her husband owned Batta’s General Store and Tavern in St. Leon. Raymond developed the infamous fried chicken recipe at the Tavern that was passed down and probably is still used today. Frances was President of Daughters of Isabella, Treasurer of the Town Board of St. Leon, and an office holder in the National Council of Catholic Women (NCCW). She loved spending time playing cards and always looked forward to the monthly cousins’ luncheon.Visitation is Tuesday, May 29, 2018 at the Parish Life Center in St. Leon, IN 10:30-12:30 followed by Mass of Christian Burial at 1:00 at St. Joseph Church in St. Leon, IN.Memorials to the American Heart Association.last_img read more

Guyana Cup 2019 gallops off tomorrow

first_imgTHE best of the best in horse racing will leave the blocks tomorrow in chase of glory and cash prizes when the 13th edition of the Guyana Cup horse race meet gets going.Over $20M in cash and prizes will be up for grabs at the Rising Sun Turf Club in Rising Sun Village, West Coast Berbice.Thousands are expected at the venue which is located just 45 minutes from the capital city, Georgetown, and with nine anticipated races on the card, turfites are sure to be busy, come race day.It is anticipated that some 80 animals from Guyana, the Caribbean Region and North America will register for the meet, which is one of the marquee events for horseracing in the region,.Some of the top animals to be on show will include Just Call Me Boss, Crown the King (Jamaica), Doublin Fashion (USA), Chameli (Jamaica), Safara (Jamaica), Southern Express (T&T), Silver & Things (T&T), Sitarr (T&T), Kentucky Woman (T&T), Super Easy (T&T) and She’s a Princess.Apart from the foreign contingent of horses, several leading jockeys from overseas are expected to participate, which will add that international flavour to the day’s event.The top five finishers in all 10 races would receive cash incentives, with the total prize purse being increased from $15M to $20M. US$50 000 in cash will be handed out tomorrow.The details of the races and prize money are listed below:– C Class and Lower feature race over a distance of one mile, $2M– Three-year-old Guyana-bred, $1M– G3 and Lower, $400 000– L3 and Lower (open to non-winners from Trinidad & Tobago), $350 000– Two-year-old Guyana-bred ove, $300 000– J3 and Lower over seven furlongs, $300 000– L Class for Colts, $250 000– L Class Filly and Mare, $250 000last_img read more