Disability Resource Office supports Saint Mary’s students

first_imgEditor’s note: This is the second day in a series on disability at Notre Dame and Saint Mary’s. Today’s stories examine the services available to students at the University and the College.Saint Mary’s created the Disabilities Resource Office (DRO) in 2004 to provide students with access to accommodations granted under the Americans with Disabilities Act, director Iris Giamo said. Prior to the creation of the office, associate dean Susan Vanek worked with students to ensure they received the accommodations they needed.Giamo said there are three prongs of disability that the office serves including “learning, chronic medical and psychiatric disabilities.”Eric Richelsen | The Observer Students with disease vary from serious asthma, Crohn’s disease, irritable bowel syndrome and immunological diseases, she said. Learning disabilities include dyslexia, dyscalculia, executive function and attention disorders. Psychiatric disabilities include anxiety disorders, bipolar, Asperger’s and others.Students must register with the DRO to receive accommodations, which are reviewed on a case-by-case basis, Giamo said.Students eligible for educational accommodations might receive extended time and reduced-distraction room, note-takers and print materials in alternate formats — electronic and audio.Giamo said the DRO provides students access for what they need under the law and any grade they earn is a result of hard work.“We consider the established history, self-report and third party documentation and evaluations,” she said. “Saint Mary’s is a small campus, and it spreads responsibility for compliance with disability protections to each member in our community.”Giamo said her office teaches students to be independent and learn to advocate for themselves.“The office empowers students,” she said. “Disabled students may need extra time to show mastery of a subject, and it’s essential that they have access to curriculum.”Giamo said Saint Mary’s has attracted several students with physical disabilities over the years, but this fall the College will welcome the first student in a wheelchair in at least 12 years.The DRO works closely with Residence Life and Facilities staff to provide the physical access needed and updates in adherence to legal architectural guidelines are made when necessary, Giamo said.Giamo said ADA has increased the number of students that can attend college.“Eight percent of the student population at Saint Mary’s identifies as having a disability,” she said. “Only 75 percent of that eight percent use their accommodation.”According to Giamo, the reason only 75 percent of students may use their accommodations is because many students learn to compensate or may not need it for a certain classes.Many practitioners in the field think the number is close to 10 percent nationally, Giamo said.Equal access for people with disabilities is part of civil rights and for this reason professors are required to include information about the DRO on their syllabi, Giamo said.“This has definitely raised the profile of the office and allowed students to address what they might need,” she said. “We have an exceptional faculty here and not only for students with disabilities”Giamo said it is crucial for students to share their concerns about accessibility and accommodations with the College and the DRO.“It is only when people write or talk about it that we can deal with these issues.”Other resources for students with disabilities include Office for Student Success to assist students with their academic careers.Giamo said the Office promotes academic skills and healthy study habits for students with and without disabilities. There are also volunteer tutors in each department as well as tutors in the Writing Center to help students succeed.She said there is a heightened awareness especially with the emerging field of disability studies and theory.“There’s a saying in the field that ‘anyone at any time can become disabled,’” Giamo said.Tags: ADA, Disabilities Resource Office, disability, DRO, saint mary’slast_img read more

Special Olympics bronze medalist Kevin Callaghan shares story, confronts labels

first_imgKevin Callaghan, a bronze medalist in the 5,000-meter race at the 2011 Special Olympics, spoke at Saint Mary’s on Wednesday evening regarding his experiences as an athlete. The event, sponsored by Multicultural Services, served as part of the College’s Disability Awareness Week.Saint Mary’s junior Maryselva Albarran Hernandez commented on the significance of the event, saying although there have been many projects promoting diversity and inclusion on campus, there were very few events surrounding disabilities.“We noticed that there were a lot of projects and events happening that were focused on diversity and inclusion in religion, race, ethnicity and LQBTQ issues, but there was nothing for increasing awareness on disabilities,” she said. “This is a big concern because we do have students with disabilities on our campus and it’s important for them to feel included.” Tags: 2011 Special Olympics World Summer Games, Disability Awareness Week, Kevin Callaghan, Special Olympics Natalie Weber | The Observer Special Olympian and bronze medalist Kevin Callaghan presents at Saint Mary’s on Wednesday in Vander Vennet Theatre. The event was a part of Saint Mary’s inaugural Diversity Awareness Week.Albarran Hernandez said Callaghan is committed to speaking up and helping others who suffer from intellectual disabilities, similar to those he and his brother face.“He wants to be a role model for those who may not have a voice and wants to be their voice,” she said. “He wants to be able to provide the tools for people to voice their concerns and he wants to motivate others to speak up and I love that about him.”Callaghan was diagnosed with a mild intellectual disability, which he said is nothing more than a label. He said that a disability doesn’t always mean disabled. Every person is gifted in their own way, he said, and trying to live life to its fullest with the talents that they have.“I do things like anyone else, just at a slower pace,” he said. “I can drive a car; I live in my own apartment; I am self-sufficient. It wasn’t easy though, I had to work a lot harder to achieve my goals.”Callaghan said he always enjoyed running and competing. Sports have helped him in many ways, he said, by allowing him to make connections, find his passion and make new friends. One of the biggest highlights of running was the opportunity to compete against other athletes who were just like him.“When I was 10 years old, my parents offered me to be a medical guinea pig and the doctors injected my legs with Botox,” he said. “It worked. The medicine caused my muscles to relax and I was able to walk normally. That may sound like a little thing, but when you have special needs, it’s really important to be as normal as you can be. I decided to try out for my high school’s cross-country team, and I had a great coach who didn’t care about what I couldn’t do — he only cared about what I could do. By the time I was a senior, I was the fastest guy on the team and was voted MVP by the end of the season.”Seven years ago, Callaghan, who wore his Olympic medal around his neck, competed in the Special Olympics World Summer Games in Athens, Greece.“I ran on the same track as Usain Bolt, competed against some of the best Special Olympic athletes in the world and won a bronze medal,” he said.Kevin’s father Jim Callaghan said although it was difficult coming to terms with two of his kids suffering from intellectual disabilities, his greatest goal has always been to make sure his kids were happy. Both of Kevin’s parents became actively involved in the Special Olympics as coaches.“There was an adult special Olympics group, but they didn’t have a kids division,” Jim said. “So, we called the state and said we wanna start a Logan Center kids team. The first year it was only Kevin, the next year it was like, eight kids, and now the program has been running for 20 something years.”Jim said his son is a role model for a number of people and is referred to as ‘the mayor’ by some of his friends because he knows everyone in his town.“It’s not just about me but there are so many stories of people with disabilities,” Kevin said. “I love people and I also have many friends with autism, so I always try to think about how things would affect me if I was in another person’s shoes. If it was up to me, I wish there was a universal healthcare for everybody in the world.”last_img read more

Senate discusses sexual assault, recognition of Native American history

first_imgNotre Dame student senators focused on social justice issues during their meeting Monday evening, addressing the University’s policies regarding the treatment of sexual assault survivors and Native Americans.Over the past several weeks, the student senate discussed the Trump administration’s changes to Title IX, the federal civil rights law that regulates how colleges handle sexual assault allegations. Many student leaders have expressed concerns that Notre Dame will be less responsive to victims’ needs in the wake of these new changes.Student Title IX services manager Amber Monroe spoke to the senate about the University’s sexual assault resolution process and addressed concerns about new Title IX revisions.“A lot of these [changes] are not mandates. … We’re going to be given a lot of time to figure out what [the changes] look like for Notre Dame,” Monroe said. “What I can say is we will always be Notre Dame in the sense of caring for our students.”The proposed changes to Title IX allow colleges to resolve sexual assault allegations through mediation, a process in which victims and perpetrators discuss the allegations face-to-face. Monroe clarified that Notre Dame does not plan on using this kind of face-to-face mediation for sexual assault cases.But the University does offer other “alternative resolution” processes for sexual assault cases on a voluntary basis, she said. Victims can agree to engage in these processes, which are supposed to be forms of restorative justice — a way to help victims and perpetrators heal together. “I think that we forget sometimes that these are people,” Monroe said. “Emotions, behaviors and choices affect how these processes can metastasize and what they can look like for each individual.”Monroe explained that the University developed these alternative resolution strategies in response to student feedback. Many students noted in the 2016 Campus Climate Survey that they felt their options for resolving incidents of assault were too limited. Notably, these alternative resolution processes — unlike traditional administrative resolution processes — are non-disciplinary, meaning perpetrators cannot face disciplinary action after an alternative resolution is completed.Junior and Welsh Family Hall senator Lindsay McCray said a non-disciplinary resolution could endanger students.“There have been studies that indicate that the majority of sexual assaults are committed by repeat offenders,” she said. “So, in allowing [an] alternative resolution to occur in sexual assault cases, even if it’s not mediation, how does that protect the student body at all from rapists?”Monroe said the University considers each case individually and does not allow alternative resolutions for perpetrators who could pose serious threats to other students.After concluding the discussion of Title IX, senators shifted the conversation to Native American history and culture.Senators approved a resolution calling the University administration to recognize that Notre Dame’s campus sits on land that once belonged to the Potawatomi people. The resolution encouraged a statement acknowledging this history be featured at Welcome Weekend, graduation and the Walk the Walk Week luncheon.Additionally, the senate approved a resolution calling for a Native Studies minor in the College of Arts and Letters, drawing on the example of many other universities.“This … shows the people who are Native descendants that we respect you, we affirm you,” said Marcus Winchester-Jones, sophomore and president of the Native American Student Association of Notre Dame. “It … makes it so it’s a more welcoming community for everybody.”Tags: Native American Student Association of Notre Dame, Notre Dame Student Senate, Title IX, Title IX policylast_img read more

Jamestown Plastics Pivots Production In Response To COVID-19 Crisis

first_imgImage by the County of Chautauqua Industrial Development Agency.BROCTON — A northern Chautauqua County based manufacture has adjusted its production in response to the COVID-19 pandemic.Jamestown Plastics’ owner Jay Baker, says his team has begun work designing face shields for the health care and emergency response industries.Rather than simply copy the style of face shields that have been around for decades, Baker says his company will be constructing an original design.“Innovation is hardwired into how we approach life here, and none of it would be possible without our ‘Jamestown Plastics Family’ of incredible employees who know going above and beyond is in all of our job descriptions,” said Baker. The TrueHero™ Extreme Coverage Face Shields, produced by the company, will first be deployed to a medical office in Mayville.Constructed of Clearon™, a medical grade, PETG plastic, the face shields offer exceptional visual clarity, explained Baker.Additionally, the reinforced shield features a proprietary flanged edge that, unlike flat shields, maximizes protection from the periphery. Multi-Port Exhaust channels release heat and moisture, yet preclude the entry of germs.The shield offers full-range view ability, is extremely lightweight, and easily grasped from behind to satisfy handling protocol. It attaches with an infinitely adjustable hook-and-loop strap for all-day comfort, and a foam forehead pad enhances comfort. The shield can be customized by simply trimming the material with scissors.Locally, the Chautauqua County and the County of Chautauqua Industrial Development Agency have led the charge in communicating the need for additional PPE production countywide, encouraging manufacturers to retool, where able, to produce supplies needed for COVID-19 pandemic response.The team created a logistics plan to fulfill the 14,000 face shields needed locally, followed by order coordination for the additional 59 statewide emergency operations centers. Share:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)last_img read more

New York Demands More Federal Funds To Bolster State Budget

first_imgJanuary 8, 2020 – Albany, NY – Governor Andrew M. Cuomo delivers his 2020 State of the State Address in Albany. (Mike Groll/Office of Governor Andrew M. Cuomo)ALBANY — New York lawmakers on Thursday delayed immediate decisions on how to find $10 billion in potential spending cuts in an elastic state budget aimed at keeping state government running amid a crisis brought on by a virus outbreak that has hammered New York City and upended the economy.Seated in their offices or far apart from one another in the largely vacant chambers, lawmakers took final votes on budget bills. The exact size of the budget for the next year was unclear, but lawmakers are attempting to slash as much as $10 billion from the $178 billion originally proposed by Gov. Andrew Cuomo.The extent of spending cuts will depend on whether New York receives enough federal funding or if the economy recovers enough to make up for a potential $10 to $15 billion loss in state revenue.“We can all agree that the budget we are passing is not the budget that any of us hoped to pass at the beginning of the session,” Democratic Senate Leader Andrea Stewart-Cousins said. “It’s not even the budget we expected to pass a month ago. Our state’s financial situation has been thrust into true economic crisis.” Lawmakers have agreed that the ongoing epidemic necessitates expanding the governor’s role over state spending and response efforts. The governor’s budget office would have to notify lawmakers about 1% revenue shortfalls or overspending, and the administration could cut spending if lawmakers don’t come up with their own plan in ten days.The budget deal is also set to include at least $8 billion in short-term borrowing to help the state handle a tax deadline delayed to July 15. The state can also access a $3 billion line of credit.Cuomo, a Democrat, and Stewart-Cousins called for urgent, additional federal funding to help New York respond to the outbreak.New York state government is set to receive at least $5 billion in federal aid for the cost of responding to the virus, on top of over $1 billion in emergency education funding. But Cuomo has said the amount is not enough to offset possible revenue loss and response costs that have already exceeded $1 billion.Schools are receiving nearly the same amount of funding as last year — about $28 million. Cuomo had proposed $800 million in extra school aid in January. New York will lose out on extra federal education aid if funding falls further.The budget also allows Cuomo’s administration to reduce healthcare spending this year or next.Cuomo had complained New York would lose out on billions of dollars in emergency Medicaid funds because Congress prohibited states from restricting Medicaid until the outbreak is declared over. A state task force was tasked this year to propose trimming $2.5 billion in Medicaid spending.The budget allows Cuomo’s administration to delay some Medicaid proposals amid the crisis — including another 0.5% in across-the-board Medicaid payment cuts, a cap on managed long-term care enrollment and restrictions on Medicaid-funded personal care aide programs.A coalition of several health consumer groups said cuts during or after the pandemic will devastate struggling hospitals shouldering the brunt of the outbreak.Several left-leaning advocacy groups including VOCAL-NY slammed lawmakers for failing to consider higher taxes on the state’s wealthiest residents to help provide more revenue for schools.Republicans criticized Democrats for including a host of new laws in the budget that have received little public scrutiny in recent weeks: from the legalization of paid surrogacy, to a ban on Styrofoam containers, a sweeping new paid sick leave law, an expansion of prevailing wage mandates, a ban on flavored vaping, a new small-donor public financing system, and an increased ballot threshold making it harder for third parties to qualify for the ballot.New York will also legalize e-bikes and e-scooters, add E Pluribus Unum to the state’s coat of arms, seize weapons from certain individuals linked to possible domestic abuse, establish a new “domestic act of terrorism motivated by hate” felony, and ban high-risk sexual offenders from rising the MTA.New York is also tweaking a law allowing undocumented immigrants to apply for drivers’ licenses that drew rebuke from President Trump’s administration, which had halted the import and export of used vehicles in New York and cut residents from “trusted traveler” programs. New York can now share certain state motor vehicle records that federal officials say is needed to import and export vehicles and vet New Yorkers applying to trusted traveler programs. The law aims to ensure that data can’t be used for immigration enforcement.Another budget measure backed by Cuomo would also tweak a new state law that started in January to end cash bail for 90% of crimes, allowing thousands of New Yorkers facing charges for mostly non-violent crimes to avoid being held in jail while awaiting trial.Republicans and many law enforcement officials around the state initially raised concerns that the law was emptying jails and endangering the public, while supporters said cash bail unjustly oppresses poor and minority communities.Cuomo’s proposed tweak includes making more crimes eligible for bail starting in 90 days — including felony sex trafficking, money laundering, strangulation, certain hate crimes, criminal possession of a weapon on school grounds, grand larceny, escape and failing to register as a sex offender.Cuomo said Thursday that his administration has looked at the roll-out of the new law: “I think we made the right change now.” Share:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)last_img read more

New York State Teachers Union Calls For Mandatory Mask Wearing In Schools

first_imgPexels Stock Photo.ALBANY – New York State’s Teachers Union is urging state health officials to make mask wearing mandatory in school this fall.In a statement to the media Thursday morning, New York State United Teachers says that current guidance that mandates the use of masks when six feet of social distancing cannot be maintained doesn’t go far enough.“The governor has said — and we agree — that parents and educators must be confident in their school district’s reopening plan in order for this to work,” said Union President Andy Pallotta in a statement. “As we hear of disparate mask procedures and other issues in reopening plans across the state, it’s clear that the state must step in. Making masks mandatory at all times is one step toward helping address the reservations that still exist regarding reopening school buildings.”The union is calling on state leaders to make masks mandatory indoors at all times during the school day, in an effort to help reduce the spread of COVID-19 in buildings that reopen for in-person instruction. Share:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)last_img read more

Broadway Theaters to Dim Lights in Memory of Nicholas Martin

first_img Martin’s additional Broadway directed credits included Present Laughter, Mauritius, Butley, Match, Hedda Gabler and The Rehearsal. He appeared on the Great White Way in productions including Alice in Wonderland, The Man Who Came to Dinner, Pantagleize, Exit the King, You Can’t Take It With You, The Wild Duck, Right You are If You Think You Are and The School for Scandal. Off-Broadway directing credits included Why Torture is Wrong, and the People Who Love Them, Saturn Returns, The New Century, Observe the Sons of Ulster, The Time of the Cuckoo, Chaucer in Rome, Fully Committed, Full Gallop, You Never Can Tell, Betty’s Summer Vacation, Sophistry and Bosoms and Neglect. Martin also served as artistic director at two theater companies: Boston’s Huntington Theatre Company from 2000 to 2008 and the Williamstown Theatre Festival from 2008 to 2010. “Nicky Martin spent his life dedicated to the theatre. I felt fortunate that I was able to get to know him last year during Tony Awards season when he was nominated for Best Direction of a Play for Vanya and Sonia and Masha and Spike—a lovely last act to a long and prolific career directing and acting on stage,” said Broadway League Executive Director Charlotte St. Martin in a statement. “Our thoughts are with his family, friends, and colleagues.” View Commentscenter_img Broadway theaters will dim their lights to pay tribute to the passing of distinguished director and actor Nicholas Martin, who died on April 30 after a long illness at the age of 75. Marquees will go dark for one minute at 7:45 PM on May 2.last_img read more

Odds & Ends: Shailene Woodley Wants to Star in Once & More

first_img Star Files View Comments Here’s a quick roundup of stories you may have missed today.Shailene Woodley Wants to Star in OnceShailene Woodley, who has been making a big name for herself in Tinseltown with stellar performances in films including Divergent, The Fault in Our Stars and The Descendants, wants to do a movie musical. “I think it’d be great to sing in a film. I love to sing,” the actress told Women’s Health. Along with playing Stevie Nicks, “another dream movie would be a movie like Once. It’s so romantic and sensual and musical but doesn’t feel like a musical necessarily.” We can totally see Woodley as Girl. Are you listening, Hollywood?Tony Winner Lillias White & More Will Appear in Billy Porter’s While I Yet Live Off-BroadwayThe previously reported Billy Porter penned While I Yet Live will star Tony winner Lillias White (The Life, Fela!), Emmy winner S. Epatha Merkerson (Come Back, Little Sheba), Elain Graham (Smash), Susan Heyward (The Trip to Bountiful), Kevyn Morrow (Dreamgirls) and Sharon Washington (The Scottsboro Boys). Helmed by Sheryl Kaller, the new work tells the tale of a young man’s coming of age in Pittsburgh amongst a bevy of strong-willed women. The show will run September 23 through October 31, with opening night set for October 12 at Primary Stages at the Duke.Cristin Milioti Returns to the New York Stage Tony nominee Cristin Milioti (Once), who recently wrapped her role as “the mother” on CBS’s hit comedy show How I Met Your Mother, is returning to her stage roots and appearing at Joe’s Pub on June 19. Worried you’ll miss her? Never fear, you’ll soon be able to catch the busy Wolf of Wall Street star in the new NBC comedy series A to Z.Fantasia Talks After Midnight’s Premature EndFormer After Midnight star Fantasia Barrino has opened up about the show’s premature shuttering on Broadway. “It makes me sad,” the Grammy winner revealed to Billboard. “Those young people I worked with became like family to me…I felt it was a much-needed play for people to know that jazz still lives.” You have until June 29 to catch the tuner, currently starring Patti LaBelle along with Adriane Lenox and Dule Hill, at the Brooks Atkinson.Watch Josh Groban & Boy George Channel John Travolta and Olivia Newton-JohnIf we didn’t have video footage of this, none of us would have quite believed it actually happened. Josh Groban, Boy George, David Byrne, Ezra Koenig, Steven Page and Rufus Wainwright, amongst others, recently got together for If I Loved You: Gentlemen Prefer Broadway at Toronto’s Luminato Festival and performed a number. And not just any number. Grease’s “Summer Nights.” Watch below to see who got into it, who looked embarrassed and who rocked, and we mean rocked, a falsetto. Josh Groban Billy Portercenter_img View All (4) Fantasia Barrino Cristin Miliotilast_img read more

Lindsay Lohan Confirmed for London’s Speed-the-Plow

first_img View Comments Lohan will play Karen, the role originated by Madonna in the 1988 Broadway production. She rose to fame as a child actress in The Parent Trap. She later starred in Freaky Friday, Confessions of a Teenage Drama Queen, Mean Girls, Herbie: Fully Loaded and Georgia Rule. Last year she starred in the film The Canyons opposite Broadway alum Nolan Gerard Funk. On TV, Lohan has guest-starred on King of the Hill, That 70’s Show, Ugly Betty and Glee. Dates are announced; all the notoriously tardy leading lady has to do now is turn up on time for eight shows a week. As previously speculated, Lindsay Lohan will headline David Mamet’ Speed-the-Plow in London. Directed by Lindsay Posner, the Mean Girls star will make her stage debut at London’s Playhouse Theatre. The limited engagement will begin performances on September 24 and run through November 30. Press night is set for October 2.center_img Speed-the-Plow focuses on two high-powered Hollywood executives, Charlie Fox and Bobby Gould, who have come up from the mailroom together. Charlie brings Bobby a surefire hit with a major star attached. Bobby seems certain to give the green light, until his beautiful new secretary gets involved. The play received its London premiere in 1989 and was revived in the West End in 2000 and at The Old Vic in 2008. A Broadway revival played the Ethel Barrymore Theatre in 2008. No word yet on further casting or who is understudying the role of Karen.last_img read more

Broadway.com Summer Camp, Day 23! Julie Andrews & Carol Burnett Rock Out

first_img View Comments MOST GIF-ABLE MOMENT LOOK OUT FOR… 11:55, when Andrews and Burnett give up on the medley and have a “Strangers in the Night” sob session instead. OVERALL CAMP FACTOR Two out of two matching sparkly vests.center_img We’re gonna be honest: Things around the Broadway.com offices have gotten really boring the last few weeks. It’s sweltering, it’s humid, and worst of all, no new Broadway shows open until after Labor Day. But never fear, dear readers, we’ve got a great way to spice up the month of August: Broadway.com Summer Camp! Each day for 31 days, we’re highlighting the campiest, craziest, wildest—and did we mention campiest?—videos we can find. Put on your gaudy bathing suit and dive in! WHY WE LOVE IT Julie Andrews and Carol Burnett make an adorable duo in this oh-so-campy 1971 Lincoln Center concert. They start off strong with a selection of Beatles songs including “Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band” and “With a Little Help From My Friends.” Halfway through, they start to get a little weird, throwing the Sesame Street theme song, “Age of Aquarius” and “Son of a Preacher Man” in there. Ladies, you can sing anything you want, but Ms. Andrews, we do not believe for one second that you get high with a little help from your friends.last_img read more