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LETTER TO THE EDITOR Former Selectwoman Judy OConnell Endorses Greg Bendel For Selectman

first_imgDear Wilmington Residents,We have an opportunity on Saturday, April 27th to re-elect a very worthy candidate, Greg Bendel, to the Wilmington Board of Selectmen.I have had the pleasure of knowing Greg as a person and a community volunteer for several years and it is my honor to call him my friend. Over the years, I have continued to observe Greg’s dedication to his family, his friends and to the Town of Wilmington. For as long as I can remember Greg has always had a willingness to support key initiatives and important projects for the betterment of our children, our schools and our community.During Greg’s first term on the Board of Selectmen I have been impressed with his ability to assist the town leadership team with getting the town’s business done! Greg continues to be a key supporter of the suite of services the Town of Wilmington has to offer its residents such as public education, elderly services & senior housing, youth sports & recreational programs, community health, public safety and veteran affairs to name a few. Greg has been a fiscally conservative leader, an advocate for economic development and a board member who supports the public process. Greg will tackle any issue with transparency and will be the first to offer to help in any given situation.I have had the pleasure of serving on the Board of Selectmen with Greg and have witnessed firsthand his commitment to the Town of Wilmington. We accomplished a lot together and I will be the first to say we did not always agree on every town topic. However, we respected our common ground and our differences and I always appreciated Greg’s perspective on things. Greg is honest, ethical and of the highest moral character. While working with Greg I always knew he put his head and heart in every decision he made on behalf of the residents of the Town of Wilmington and is a man who tries to always do the right thing! For this reason and many others I am certain that Greg Bendel is the right choice for the voters of Wilmington on Election Day.With Greg’s impressive resume along with his personal qualities and attributes, I believe Greg continues to be an ideal candidate for Selectman. Greg is intelligent, articulate, a team player, a great listener and has the courage and tenacity to take on the most complex issues and render informed decisions. Greg is a great asset to the Wilmington Board of Selectmen and deserves to be re-elected so he can continue to work hard to maintain and improve the quality of life for all Wilmington residents and local business owners to enjoy.Please join me on Saturday, April 27th in voting for Greg Bendel for Selectman. Thank you.Sincerely,Judith L. O’Connell Like Wilmington Apple on Facebook. Follow Wilmington Apple on Twitter. Follow Wilmington Apple on Instagram. Subscribe to Wilmington Apple’s daily email newsletter HERE. Got a comment, question, photo, press release, or news tip? Email wilmingtonapple@gmail.com.Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:Like Loading… RelatedSELECTMEN NEWS: Board Supports Fire & Police Substation In North Wilmington; Town To Vote On Project In April 2020?In “Government”LETTER TO THE EDITOR: Shawsheen Tech School Committee’s Robert Peterson Sr. Endorses Bendel For SelectmanIn “Letter To The Editor”LETTER TO THE EDITOR: Bendel Has A Proven Commitment To Helping SeniorsIn “Letter To The Editor”last_img read more

Jaguar Land Rovers sensory steering wheel uses temperature to send messages

first_img 2019 Audi RS5 Sportback review: Goody two-shoes “Research has shown people readily understand the heating and cooling dynamics to denote directions and the subtlety of temperature change can be perfect for certain feedback that doesn’t require a more intrusive audio or vibration-based cue,” said Alexandros Mouzakitis, JLR’s senior manager for electrical research, in a statement.In the future, this system might have a hand in self-driving vehicles, too. The automaker said that it’s also adapted this temperature-shifting technology to work with gear shift paddles, which could inform a driver that the swap between human and computer control is complete. Post a comment Review • 2020 Land Rover Range Rover Evoque review: Style, now with more substance Share your voice Jaguar Land Rover 2:24 More about 2020 Land Rover Range Rover Evoque Land Rover Jaguar Preview • 2020 Range Rover Evoque first drive: Stylish SUV packs X-ray vision 2019 Lamborghini Urus review: Part SUV, part supercar 5 things you need to know about the 2020 Land Rover Range… Hey, neat, more pictures of the new Land Rover Defender Tags Auto Tech Future Cars More From Roadshow 13 Photos We’ve had haptic feedback in steering wheels for years now, and it’s a great way to notify the driver of a lane departure or whatever without requiring them to stare at a visual alert. Now, Jaguar Land Rover is taking it one step further by bringing temperature into the equation.Jaguar Land Rover this week unveiled its “sensory steering wheel concept.” Developed with the help of Glasgow University, the automaker is investigating whether using heating and cooling can alert drivers to less pertinent information. This wouldn’t replace haptic feedback, but rather it would create a lower-priority tier of messages with its own unique notification method.Here’s how it works. Each side of the steering wheel can be heated or cooled by up to 10.8 degrees Fahrenheit, and the rate of change is adjustable to suit the driver’s preference. It could alert drivers of an upcoming turn in either direction, when to change lanes or if there’s poor visibility ahead. For things requiring much more pertinent notifications, like a lane departure, haptic feedback is still faster and more efficient for communication. Now playing: Watch this: 0 2019 McLaren 600LT: Balanced and bonkerslast_img read more

103 Rohingyas detained in Chittagong

first_imgPolice arrested 103 Rohingya refugees from different parts of Patiya upazila of Chittagong from Sunday night till Monday morning.Acting on information that some Rohingyas were staying in different parts of the upazila, a team of police conducted an overnight drive and arrested 103 Rohingyas, said police officer-in-charge Sheikh Neyamat Ullah.All of them will be sent back to Kutupalong Rohingya camp in Ukhiya upazila of Cox’s Bazar, the OC added.Several lakh Rohingya people have entered Bangladesh in the last several weeks following fresh attacks on Rohingya Muslims by the Myanmar army in Rakhine State.At least 27 check-posts have been set up in Chittagong and Cox’s Bazar to prevent spread of Rohingyas to other places.last_img read more

Gutting Gun Bill A Good Omen

first_imgOn July 25 the Baltimore City Council’s Judiciary and Legislative Investigations Committee voted 5-2 to amend the council’s ill-fated attempt to impose a mandatory minimum one-year sentence on anyone “illegally” carrying a gun within 100 yards of a school, public park, church or any other public facility in the city.The revised bill would impose the one-year sentence only on those committing a second gun possession offense or carrying a gun in commission of a crime against a person or property. Ultimately, the amended measure would be neutralized by existing Maryland law.The response to the original proposed legislation was fast, furious and decidedly negative in many of the city’s mostly Black, mostly poor communities. However, the council’s actions to gut the bill may have avoided a catastrophe similar to what we witnessed in April 2015 following the death (some say murder) of Freddie Gray.Sean Yoes (Courtesy Photo)This wasn’t just a knee jerk response to the very real crisis of violence and murder this city has endured over the last three years (although many would argue the epidemic of violence has been at a crisis level for decades). There is a tone deaf quality to the argument that implementing a mandatory minimum gun law in Baltimore City would somehow assuage our fears and deter violence.In fact, several people who work at City Hall have asked privately, ”Who advised the mayor on this legislation?“ “Mandatory minimums don’t work,” said Councilman Brandon Scott (D-2nd) during last week’s tumultuous hearing prior to the council committee stripping down the hapless gun law.However, the result of implementing the bill as it was originally crafted would have almost assuredly resulted in hundreds, if not thousands, more arrests by the end of 2017.How many of those arrests would have fallen into the category of “illegal arrests” a term made popular during the days of the nefarious zero tolerance policing implemented by then Mayor Martin O’Malley? There are thousands of Black men, their families and communities that still have not recovered from the zero tolerance policy, which at its zenith, was responsible for the arrest of more than 100,000 people per year for several years, in a city of just over 600,000 people.Many argue, with our city being ravaged by violence and 206 homicides (as of August 2), we are at a very tenuous tipping point in Baltimore. The implementation of a mandatory minimum gun law and its aftermath could have had a similar effect as the bad days of zero tolerance policing, possibly recreating circumstances that sparked the uprising of 2015. We underestimate that potential at our own peril.I guess the original bill could technically be resurrected, but it seems highly unlikely because of the vigilance of several of the council’s youngest and newest members.The “renegade eight,” the eight newest members of the council voted in during last year’s general election, entered the chamber with the hopes of many of the city’s most disenfranchised citizens riding on their shoulders. In these cynical political times punctuated over the last six months by the unprecedented and potentially apocalyptic antics of the 45th president, hope in our political leaders has been hard to come by.Yet, the newest members of the council began their tenures by spearheading the unanimous condemnation  of statements made by President Donald Trump, just days prior to his visit to Baltimore in December 2016. The first official action of the council denounced Trump’s “divisive and scapegoating rhetoric, rooted in hate and prejudice.” And the rebuke of Trump came as Mayor Catherine Pugh was preparing to ask the 45th president for much needed federal resources for the city. It was a symbolic gesture of course, but perhaps one that set a critical tone going forward.However, the council’s actions in snuffing out the mandatory minimum gun law was real action taken against what many argue was a really bad bill. And in the process they may have diffused  a very volatile situation in our city festering beneath the summer sun.Sean Yoes is the AFRO’s Baltimore editor and host and executive producer of First Edition, which airs Monday through Friday, 5p.m.-7 p.m. on WEAA, 88.9.last_img read more

Devils Hole pupfish found to be a lot younger than thought

first_imgDevils Hole pupfish (Cyprinodon diabolis). Credit: Olin Feuerbacher, USFWS / Wikipedia The existence of small, goldfish sized, dark blue fish living in a water filled fissure in the Mojave Desert has led to many theories regarding how they got there and how they have survived. For many years, the consensus has been that they got there due to flooding during the Pleistocene epoch, approximately 10 to 20,000 years ago. How they managed to survive for so long in such a remote, small and hot environment has been a mystery. But now, new evidence suggests that the pupfish may not have been living in the Hole for nearly that long.Prior research has shown that the pupfish are a unique species—with features that are unique to them alone among pupfish, such as the lack of a dorsal fin, bigger eyes and darker scales. To learn more about the origins of the species, which scientists have described as having the smallest range of any vertebrate on Earth, the group conducted a genetic analysis of 56 pupfish from around the Death Valley area (including one of the pupfish from Devils Hole which was found dead) and other parts of the world, sequencing over 13,000 different stretches of DNA—a process that allowed them to create a family tree. To gauge the historical age of the pupfish from Devils Hole, the team averaged the rate of gene mutations in its cousins. Doing so showed that the fish likely first inhabited their isolated environment approximately 105 to 830 years ago and then evolved very quickly to allow them to survive.The researchers did not find any evidence that might explain how the fish got there during that time frame, but suggest it is possible that people living in the area put them there as a means of maintaining a food source in the desert, or perhaps birds carried fish eggs from other, less remote water sources. Biological sciences professor publishes pupfish research Journal information: Proceedings of the Royal Society B Explore further © 2016 Phys.orgcenter_img (Phys.org)—A team of researchers from several institutions in the U.S. has found evidence that suggests that pupfish living in Devils Hole are not nearly as ancient as has been previously assumed. In their paper published in the journal Proceedings of the Royal Society B, the team describes a genetic study they conducted on the fish and others that are related to them, and what they found as a result. More information: Christopher H. Martin et al. Diabolical survival in Death Valley: recent pupfish colonization, gene flow and genetic assimilation in the smallest species range on earth, Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences (2016). DOI: 10.1098/rspb.2015.2334AbstractOne of the most endangered vertebrates, the Devils Hole pupfish Cyprinodon diabolis, survives in a nearly impossible environment: a narrow subterranean fissure in the hottest desert on earth, Death Valley. This species became a conservation icon after a landmark 1976 US Supreme Court case affirming federal groundwater rights to its unique habitat. However, one outstanding question about this species remains unresolved: how long has diabolis persisted in this hellish environment? We used next-generation sequencing of over 13 000 loci to infer the demographic history of pupfishes in Death Valley. Instead of relicts isolated 2–3 Myr ago throughout repeated flooding of the entire region by inland seas as currently believed, we present evidence for frequent gene flow among Death Valley pupfish species and divergence after the most recent flooding 13 kyr ago. We estimate that Devils Hole was colonized by pupfish between 105 and 830 years ago, followed by genetic assimilation of pelvic fin loss and recent gene flow into neighbouring spring systems. Our results provide a new perspective on an iconic endangered species using the latest population genomic methods and support an emerging consensus that timescales for speciation are overestimated in many groups of rapidly evolving species. Citation: Devils Hole pupfish found to be a lot younger than thought (2016, January 27) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2016-01-devils-hole-pupfish-lot-younger.html This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more