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GCI Wrapping Up Upgrade Project On The Kenai Peninsula

first_imgGCI is upgrading two towers near Summit Lake and Cooper Mountain later this fall that are not accessible by road. Crews and approximately 10,000 pounds of equipment and materials will be delivered to the sites by helicopter. Though the areas served by this project target some of the state’s busiest stretches of highway, delivering connectivity still requires going off the beaten path. Facebook0TwitterEmailPrintFriendly分享GCI is working on wrapping a $6.3 million LTE wireless expansion project on the Kenai Peninsula. The project involves more than 30 GCI technicians and engineers and includes upgrades at 43 sites throughout the Peninsula and the construction of two new towers that will bring expanded wireless and data coverage between Sterling and Soldotna as well as the Homer Spit.center_img Greg Klimek, vice president, GCI Wireless Marketing: “Investing in the Kenai Peninsula has been a high priority for GCI and we are pleased that the project is in the final stretch. Upgrades to 43 sites across the peninsula means move coverage over a wider area and faster speeds and service for our customers.” Upgrades will bring LTE data coverage and improved voice service along additional sections of the Seward and Sterling Highways.last_img read more

Borough Mayor Vetoes Bed Tax

first_imgThe ordinance would have asked the voters to amend the borough’s sales tax code to establish a 10 percent areawide sales tax on temporary lodging. It was previously introduced as 12 percent. The ordinance was also amended to include overnight camping facilities. This is the third attempt at the passage of the ordinance introduced by Assemblymember Dale Bagley. The original ordinance passed the assembly in a vote of  in a 5-3 vote, with one exemption in June. A number of amendments were made to the ordinance prior to its final passage. Facebook0TwitterEmailPrintFriendly分享Just kidding, voters will not see the ‘bed tax’ ordinance on the upcoming fall ballot like previously thought after Borough Mayor Charlie Pierce used his veto power to remove it at Tuesday nights meeting. Mayor Pierce Pierce said he did not support a targeted tax on specific activities or services. The vote ended up as a tie, with assembly members Hal Smalley, Willy Dunne, Brent Hibbert and Dale Bagley voting to override the veto.last_img read more

How Google plans to make foldable phones and popup selfie cameras better

first_img Foldable Phones Tags 3 Jul 10 • How to get Android 10 right now “Developers don’t plan their apps … with the idea that there would be two different screens with two different aspect ratios,” said Samat. “We wanted to make that as easy as possible to code for. If you make it easy and people can start experimenting and seeing what’s possible; it can accelerate the entire category.” Google’s tools for app developers stems from its close collaboration on the Galaxy Fold. After working with Samsung and other, undisclosed phone brands, Google is opening up its code and tools to other OEMs (original equipment manufacturers).Google’s interest in Android for foldable phones doesn’t stop with its partner OEMs. The company is also working on its own foldable Pixel, at least for internal testing. “We’re definitely prototyping the technology. We’ve been doing it for a long time,” Mario Queiroz, Pixel’s development lead, said in an interview last week at Google’s headquarters. “I don’t think there’s a clear use case yet.” The Oppo Reno’s camera pops up at a jaunty angle. Oppo What about pop-up selfie cameras?Phones with front-facing cameras are also getting a makeover. There are now several models that pop up or slide out of the body, and Samsung Galaxy A80 has three cameras that swivel to take photos in either direction. The One Plus 7 is rumored to have a pop-up camera, too, when it launches on May 14.Cameras that live in the phone’s body aren’t just for show. As with foldable screens, pop-up cameras exist to give you more screen space — in this case, by removing the front-facing sensors from the phone’s face. This design is a way around having to add a screen notch. captura-de-pantalla-2019-03-08-a-las-14-14-35The OnePlus 7 is rumored to have a front-facing pop-up camera. Slashleaks “I think there’ll be many interesting different form factors in the way people innovate with the front-facing sensors,” said Samat. “We’re starting to see this form factors come to life.Google is working with OEM partners to make sure that the different phone-makers don’t need to worry about the camera’s exact location in order to use Android’s camera software. Every phone has a slightly different camera array, which means developers have to add code to optimize their apps. To that end, Google is building out a library called CameraX , which gives developers “a layer of abstraction” so they don’t have to code for each new configuration a phone might take. The CameraX library comes shipped as a developer library on top of Android. The benefit of CameraX doesn’t stop at pop-up cameras. It has the potential to help third-party camera apps faster, more stable and more consistent, too. Our Galaxy Fold didn’t break. Here’s what’s good and… • Now playing: Watch this: Now playing: Watch this: For example, they can turn a phone into a tablet, as with the Fold and Huawei Mate X. We could also see narrow phones that open vertically, as with the throwback flip phone style of the rumored foldable Motorola Razr, and even designs that bend around your wrist like a watch.”Historically, a mobile phone and a tablet have been two devices. If you think about them being the same device … it can be quite delightful,” said Samat, who has used the Galaxy Fold. Google’s support for foldable centers on App Continuity, which helps you switch apps between foldable phones’ smaller and larger screens without skipping a beat. This software is especially critical because, while device-makers have internally prototyped foldable phones for years, most developers are brand new to the design. reading • How Google plans to make foldable phones and pop-up selfie cameras better Google I/O 2019 10:12 Google I/O 2019 Aug 26 • Android Q has a name: Android 10. Here’s how you’ll use it Jul 24 • Nest Hub Max: Google’s 10-inch Assistant smart display costs $230, debuts Sept. 9 Share your voice Aug 12 • Google will ask you to migrate your Nest account soon: Here’s what you need to know 60 Photos 4:54 See All Google can read the writing on the wall: foldable phones and devices with selfie cameras that pop up from the body are set to pick up steam in 2019, and Android has to be ready. On Tuesday at I/O 2019, Google officially confirmed that it’s including tools in Android Q that will help keep the OS humming along on phones with moving parts. Google had already declared last November that it would support foldable designs like Samsung’s Galaxy Fold.Foldable phones are especially timely, promising to shake up the phone industry with new designs that can expand your screen space without making devices larger. Although early problems with the Galaxy Fold caused a delay in releasing the phone, which Samsung is scrambling to fix, other devices like the Huawei Mate X, rumored foldable Motorola Razr and designs that bend around your wrist like a watch could potentially tangle up Android apps without Google’s guidance.”We’re seeing perhaps the reinvention of the mobile form factor,” Sameer Samat, VP of product management for Android and Play, said of foldable phones during an interview. “While it’s very early, we may look back on this and understand how profound it was.” Android Q beta: What’s new? Close up with the Galaxy Fold screen, notch and hinge Comments Android 10 (Android Q) Google Originally published at 4 a.m. PT.last_img read more

China Catches 680 Fugitive Criminals Through AntiCorruption Campaign

first_imgThe Chinese government announced on Thursday that it nabbed 680 absconding suspects accused of committing economic crimes, as part of its anti-corruption campaign.Of the 680 people captured, 117 were absconding for more than a decade and 390 surrendered.Calling the number of fugitives captured “unprecedented,” China’s Ministry of Public Security said that the 680 people were caught between July and December 2014 and the number was 4.5 times more than the number of people nabbed in 2013, according to Reuters.The Chinese government launched the campaign in July 2013 to hunt down corrupt businessmen and officials. Since then, the campaign has managed to clamp down on several corrupt officials in the public and private sector. More recently, Zhang Kunsheng, the assistant minister of foreign affairs was put under government scrutiny for an undisclosed reason. Kunsheng is the first senior diplomat to have been convicted, the Financial Times reports.Corruption in China has been a rampant problem. According to data provided by Global Financial Integrity, an NGO that works to curb illicit finances globally,  about $1.08 trillion flowed out of the second-largest economy of the world between 2002 and 2011 alone. China also topped the firm’s list of the most corrupt country.President Xi Jinping has vowed to clean the country of its corrupt officials. Even at the G20 Summit at Brisbane in November 2014, China came out as a strong supporter of anti-corruption policies.The Chinese president’s anti-corruption campaign has already started yielding results. A government official spoke on conditions of part-anonymity to NPR.org on the recent corruption crackdown and said that the government’s efforts really seem to be working.The official explained that after years of the “extra income,” people are suddenly seeing their incomes drop by 30 percent.”For instance, for every $16 a higher-level official embezzles, he can spit about $3 down to us lower-level officials. The problem now is upper-level people can’t embezzle the $16, so there’s no three bucks for us,” the official explained, somewhat agitated.last_img read more

Summer Film Camp Lights The Way For Young Filmmakers

first_imgBy Mark F. Gray, Special to the AFROJanice Murphy remembers what it was like to miss out on summer camp when she was growing up.  After her parents divorced the family couldn’t afford the extracurricular opportunities that expose children to culture and can lead to an appreciation for the fine arts. Now the organization she started, Light The Way Foundation, is giving kids from the DMV a platform to be creative and tell their stories through film documentaries.For the past three summers the Light The Way Foundation team of volunteers turns the silver screen into a space that allows for a group of adolescent students to grow from the experience of creating documentaries that offer a window into their souls based on their lives. With a red carpet world premiere at AFI Silver Theatre in Silver Spring, this year’s group of aspiring of young filmmakers debuted their collaborative effort called “15 Scenes.”  The documentary shares their inspirational voyages trying to navigate the waves of a constantly changing world.Light The Way Foundation campers share the red carpet during the premiere of their film debut “15 Scenes” at the AFI Theatre in Silver Spring. (Courtesy photo)The students used the basic filmmaking skills learned during the week-long program to tell the story of the challenges each has faced in their life while growing up. In five days students learn how to produce individual segments that combine to enlighten, inspire, and uplift in just under 15 minutes.With raw unfiltered emotion 15 students – between nine and 12 years old – tell real life stories of how they are dealing or have dealt with adversity.  The campers are candid in subjects ranging from bullying to divorce.  They were trained in how to write scripts, shoot video and tell their stories on screen using technology ranging from state of the art video cameras to smart phones.Collaboration began immediately when facing a deadline of less than 30 hours to complete the projects. The junior filmmakers found a common ground on what subjects they would discuss and how they could seamlessly tell the story. By the second day of camp the scriptwriting and shooting had begun.“This is how the kids are telling their story these days,” LTW Founder Janice Murphy told the AFRO.  “It’s an extension of the learning process. We want to expose them to the skills needed to produce films one day”.The documentary instruction is an extension of LTW’s original camp enrichment program. Since the foundation’s inception it has sponsored summer golfers with equipment at Langston Golf Course and piano, tap, and ballet classes at Mother Dears in the District.  LTW has recently started a boy’s mentoring program at Mattawoman Middle School in Waldorf. Howard University is home for the instructional portion of the camp and serves as the set for the interviews that comprise this year’s documentary.There is an ironic charm to “15 Scenes” which makes the stories being told by the kids so riveting.  The innocence of the way the kids share their tales of life with little scripting brings their messages to the audience in a manner that blends to offset the basic production value of the film.However, opening night marked the first time many of the campers had ever been the focus of so much attention. Following their initial walk down the red carpet they had the chance to watch themselves during this private screening of the film. They also returned afterwards for a question and answer session to interact with an audience comprised of family and friends.  For at least one evening these campers were celebrities who were experts at the craft of filmmaking.“They were excited to explain to the audience what a boom [microphone] is,” Murphy said. “It was exciting just to watch them be excited”.last_img read more

Manned vs Unmanned Space Exploration Part 2

first_imgWatching the Apollo landings on the moon as a child I could hardly have imagined I was seeing the end of an era – that of manned exploration of space. Shuttle trips to low earth orbit not withstanding; the human race has stopped reaching for the stars – with manned missions, of course. Now, the new explorers are robots. Will they be the ultimate space traveler? Or will man, with all faults and flexibility, take back this role? Read Part 1 Citation: Manned vs. Unmanned Space Exploration (Part 2) (2005, November 25) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2005-11-unmanned-space-exploration_1.html Right: Japan’s failed Nozomi (Planet B) missionCrewed missions are more costly, but also more effective. Human calibrated experiments setup up on the moon by Apollo missions functioned perfectly for 8 years until shut down for fiscal reasons in 1977. Robotic missions, while they may carry similar instruments, are incredibly difficult to place and calibrate. Ruggedness wins over accuracy so instruments are less sensitive and deliver fewer details in the data they collect. Robots must rely on redundancy to deal with any problems while astronauts can creatively solve almost any problem. The Hubble Space telescope was repaired by teams from the Space Shuttle making it one of the most successful missions ever. Geologists make up the most vocal group of proponents for manned missions. While probe data is useful, they contend one mission with a live geologist could answer all their questions in a few weeks, while endless robotic probes may never be able to provide a clear picture of Mars. A geologist can apply all his or her senses to quickly make determinations as to what to study and what to ignore. Robotic probes could easily miss important clues and waste time on unproductive lines of exploration and study. A human still has much acuter vision than even the best video cameras and, more importantly, can process data with to the solar system’s best supercomputer – the human brain – on the spot.It’s understood the shuttle has outlived its usefulness and new programs are needed. Even NASA Chief Administrator Michael Griffin has suggested the development of the Space Shuttle and International Space Station was a mistake by saying, “It is now commonly accepted that was not the right path. We are now trying to change the path while doing as little damage as we can.”Scientists aside, public opinion has done much to keep manned spaceflight alive. Poll shows a resounding 80% or more people support continuation of manned programs like the shuttle on and the International Space Station despite accidents and lack of worth as space labs. Humanity sees itself conquering space directly, not by proxy.Indeed, support for astronauts extends well beyond simple polling. People are spending money to go into space as tourists. Chapters of the Mars Society exist in almost every major country – all pushing for manned missions with goals like the human exploration of Mars.“Although some aspects of exploring and colonizing Mars still need refining and fine tuning, the lion’s share of the technology and the understanding of the human condition are already in existence. The major missing factor is simply the realization and the commitment necessary to begin. The people of the Mars Society are working to educate and convince the political powers, the industry leaders, and you and me. We all have a stake in this.” – Dr. Robert Zubrin, author “On to Mars 2”, founder Mars Society. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Low-cost Moon mission puts India among lunar pioneers Part 2The Case for Human Spaceflight While no scientist can deny the value of robotic space exploration, many feel the need for complementary manned programs. Most agree that, for basic survey missions, robotic probes produce dramatic results. It’s in field study that scientist crewed missions could do better. Ironically, it is the same people who run the unmanned space missions that are clamoring for human crewed missions to follow them up.Part of the problem is the limited abilities and scope of each robotic mission. To save money and reduce failure rates to a minimum, robotic probes are stripped down to essentials. Although these probes gather important data, much of it is ambiguous for lack of the probe’s ability to do follow up tests. Today’s robots cannot start up new lines of investigation. Raw data is useful but often raises more questions. Even worse, the data is often completely unexpected leaving the scientists at a loss to explain the results. They need further missions to run different tests and, the cornerstone of all good science – verification by repeatedly testing the same area over time.This repeated testing of results becomes difficult with unmanned mission failure rates. Take the Mars exploration programs: out of 31 missions by the USSR, Russia, the US and Japan since 1960, all but 10 failed and only 5 met their original goals. Compare that to the high success rates of astronaut crewed missions – almost 90%. Right: FMars habitat undergoing tests at Devon Island, Nunavut, CanadaPresident Bush has even stepped up with a promise finish the International Space station by 2010 – only five years late – and for a manned mission to the moon by 2020. Much political wrangling will need to be done, however, if the funding is to materialize. Safety problems with the shuttle program continue to dog NASA as well, further putting in doubt these goals.It will take more than just the words of a few politicians to keep manned spaceflight alive. The will of the people needs to be felt through their representatives on Congressional budget committees – we have the money and the technology. Do we have the will?One avenue now being actively explored by space enthusiasts is private funding. Corporate spending in spaceflight has been grater than governments since 1996 when $77 billion dollars was invested. Private industry has more than 1,200 launches – mostlycommunications satellites– before 2007. Like in the days of early pioneering, private initiative is becoming the mainstay of space exploration. The question is: can manned space exploration pay? After all, corporations are about by profit for their shareholders.We must go to space – if not now, later, as the living area and resources on Earth dry up. Will we be on the forefront of this exploration, living in space and adapting it to our will like the hardy pioneers of old? Or will we stay at home to see these new horizons via virtual reality – only moving in to our new space bound homes when they are safe and comfortable?by Chuck Rahls, Copyright 2005 PhysOrg.com Explore furtherlast_img read more