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How Will Porzingis And The Knicks Cope With Life After Melo

The vast majority of the attention given to the Carmelo Anthony trade has focused on Oklahoma City, and rightfully so. The Thunder, coming off a campaign in which MVP Russell Westbrook was perhaps the NBA’s loneliest franchise player, have added two All-Stars this summer and possibly positioned themselves as the top challenger to the Golden State Warriors.Meanwhile, the Knicks — the league’s most valuable club and the team on the other end of the Anthony deal — have been an afterthought in all this. The swap was one New York badly needed to make so it could fully turn the page on an era in which the Knicks haven’t secured a playoff berth in four seasons. But this new chapter without Anthony figures to present an entirely new set of questions.Chief among them: Can 22-year-old Kristaps Porzingis — who averaged 18 points a night as a second or third option — step into Anthony’s role and become the Knicks’ leading man?At first glance, the answer would appear to be yes. This past season, Porzingis became a far more efficient scorer at the rim and from midrange. He improved from 58 percent at the basket as a rookie to 70 percent in Year 2 while also jumping from 41 percent from the 10-to-16-foot range to 48 percent. He managed to get better from the 3-point stripe, too, knocking down shots from the arc at a league-average clip. And it can’t be overlooked that the 7-foot-3 big man with the skill set of a guard actually managed to shoot better when Anthony (and former MVP Derrick Rose) was off the court than when they played together.Video Playerhttps://fivethirtyeight.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/09/kpfadeaway.mp400:0000:0000:08Use Up/Down Arrow keys to increase or decrease volume.Video Playerhttps://fivethirtyeight.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/09/kpdrive.mp400:0000:0000:09Use Up/Down Arrow keys to increase or decrease volume.Still, that detail alone isn’t evidence that Porzingis will thrive without Anthony. In fact, when you look more closely, it appears that at least some of Porzingis’s success as a lead option stemmed from who his competition was. Specifically, he turned in some of his most accurate shooting during the first six minutes of second and fourth periods last season, per NBA Savant — times where he likely would’ve been feasting on second-string defenses.1Though it may be a coincidence, Porzingis has struggled most in his first two seasons during first quarters, when he’d likely be facing starting-level competition. By contrast, he’s shot nearly 50 percent for his career during the first six minutes of second periods, when he’d be facing backups, since the majority of NBA starters catch their breath for the first few minutes of the second quarter.That speaks to why the Knicks were just 2-16 without Anthony2And 2-11 when Porzingis played without Anthony. the past two seasons: No one else on the roster could generate offense as efficiently as Melo while also facing the sort of defensive pressure he was seeing.3While he generated a greater share of his own baskets with Anthony off the court, it’s worth noting that nearly 42 percent of Porzingis’s makes last season were assisted by Anthony, Derrick Rose or Brandon Jennings, all players who are no longer with the Knicks. That was especially the case in one-on-ones and post-ups, for which Melo has an affinity.New York scored on 47 percent of Anthony’s one-on-one plays and came away with at least one point when he was aggressively double-teamed in the post 43 percent of the time, according to Synergy Sports. The Knicks scored on just 34 percent of Porzingis’s one-on-ones and were successful just 23 percent of the time — for a measly 0.57 points per play — when opponents sent hard double-teams at him in the post. A lot can be attributed to Porzingis’s need to develop more lower-body strength and establish better position, as he often catches the ball way too far from the paint to back down his man.Video Playerhttps://fivethirtyeight.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/09/badearlyshot.mp400:0000:0000:14Use Up/Down Arrow keys to increase or decrease volume.Video Playerhttps://fivethirtyeight.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/09/porzingistoofarout.mp400:0000:0000:13Use Up/Down Arrow keys to increase or decrease volume.None of this is to suggest that Porzingis — the rare budding star who has as much defensive ability as offensive ability — isn’t capable of eventually being the centerpiece of a team. At this point, he should be the least of the Knicks’ worries; the club should be using this coming season to figure out who to slot next to him going forward.However, that open-tryout mentality will be complicated by the current roster configuration, as the Knicks are currently heavy on bigs they need to find playing time for. Enes Kanter (acquired in the trade), Willy Hernangomez and Kyle O’Quinn are all talented, but figure to create a logjam at center if they all make it to opening night. The presence of 32-year-old Joakim Noah, who has three years left on one of the NBA’s worst contracts, doesn’t help matters, either.A trade to move one of them — and possibly veteran swingman Courtney Lee, who deserves an opportunity to latch on with a contender rather than taking part in a rebuild — would make sense. Ideally, the Knicks would use those returns to get future draft picks and a young player or two who can defend, since Kanter, Doug McDermott (also acquired in the Melo deal) and Tim Hardaway Jr. are all solid scorers while being subpar on the other side of the ball. New York, which has ranked in the bottom 10 on defense for 11 of the last 15 seasons, will need to find some sense of balance — a process that will likely take the better part of the next few years as these players figure themselves out.But even if the next couple seasons are marked by growing pains, at least the Knicks can finally turn their attention to roster development instead of wondering how to make the failed marriage with Anthony work. read more

Jaguar Land Rovers sensory steering wheel uses temperature to send messages

first_img 2019 Audi RS5 Sportback review: Goody two-shoes “Research has shown people readily understand the heating and cooling dynamics to denote directions and the subtlety of temperature change can be perfect for certain feedback that doesn’t require a more intrusive audio or vibration-based cue,” said Alexandros Mouzakitis, JLR’s senior manager for electrical research, in a statement.In the future, this system might have a hand in self-driving vehicles, too. The automaker said that it’s also adapted this temperature-shifting technology to work with gear shift paddles, which could inform a driver that the swap between human and computer control is complete. Post a comment Review • 2020 Land Rover Range Rover Evoque review: Style, now with more substance Share your voice Jaguar Land Rover 2:24 More about 2020 Land Rover Range Rover Evoque Land Rover Jaguar Preview • 2020 Range Rover Evoque first drive: Stylish SUV packs X-ray vision 2019 Lamborghini Urus review: Part SUV, part supercar 5 things you need to know about the 2020 Land Rover Range… Hey, neat, more pictures of the new Land Rover Defender Tags Auto Tech Future Cars More From Roadshow 13 Photos We’ve had haptic feedback in steering wheels for years now, and it’s a great way to notify the driver of a lane departure or whatever without requiring them to stare at a visual alert. Now, Jaguar Land Rover is taking it one step further by bringing temperature into the equation.Jaguar Land Rover this week unveiled its “sensory steering wheel concept.” Developed with the help of Glasgow University, the automaker is investigating whether using heating and cooling can alert drivers to less pertinent information. This wouldn’t replace haptic feedback, but rather it would create a lower-priority tier of messages with its own unique notification method.Here’s how it works. Each side of the steering wheel can be heated or cooled by up to 10.8 degrees Fahrenheit, and the rate of change is adjustable to suit the driver’s preference. It could alert drivers of an upcoming turn in either direction, when to change lanes or if there’s poor visibility ahead. For things requiring much more pertinent notifications, like a lane departure, haptic feedback is still faster and more efficient for communication. Now playing: Watch this: 0 2019 McLaren 600LT: Balanced and bonkerslast_img read more