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How Google plans to make foldable phones and popup selfie cameras better

first_img Foldable Phones Tags 3 Jul 10 • How to get Android 10 right now “Developers don’t plan their apps … with the idea that there would be two different screens with two different aspect ratios,” said Samat. “We wanted to make that as easy as possible to code for. If you make it easy and people can start experimenting and seeing what’s possible; it can accelerate the entire category.” Google’s tools for app developers stems from its close collaboration on the Galaxy Fold. After working with Samsung and other, undisclosed phone brands, Google is opening up its code and tools to other OEMs (original equipment manufacturers).Google’s interest in Android for foldable phones doesn’t stop with its partner OEMs. The company is also working on its own foldable Pixel, at least for internal testing. “We’re definitely prototyping the technology. We’ve been doing it for a long time,” Mario Queiroz, Pixel’s development lead, said in an interview last week at Google’s headquarters. “I don’t think there’s a clear use case yet.” The Oppo Reno’s camera pops up at a jaunty angle. Oppo What about pop-up selfie cameras?Phones with front-facing cameras are also getting a makeover. There are now several models that pop up or slide out of the body, and Samsung Galaxy A80 has three cameras that swivel to take photos in either direction. The One Plus 7 is rumored to have a pop-up camera, too, when it launches on May 14.Cameras that live in the phone’s body aren’t just for show. As with foldable screens, pop-up cameras exist to give you more screen space — in this case, by removing the front-facing sensors from the phone’s face. This design is a way around having to add a screen notch. captura-de-pantalla-2019-03-08-a-las-14-14-35The OnePlus 7 is rumored to have a front-facing pop-up camera. Slashleaks “I think there’ll be many interesting different form factors in the way people innovate with the front-facing sensors,” said Samat. “We’re starting to see this form factors come to life.Google is working with OEM partners to make sure that the different phone-makers don’t need to worry about the camera’s exact location in order to use Android’s camera software. Every phone has a slightly different camera array, which means developers have to add code to optimize their apps. To that end, Google is building out a library called CameraX , which gives developers “a layer of abstraction” so they don’t have to code for each new configuration a phone might take. The CameraX library comes shipped as a developer library on top of Android. The benefit of CameraX doesn’t stop at pop-up cameras. It has the potential to help third-party camera apps faster, more stable and more consistent, too. Our Galaxy Fold didn’t break. Here’s what’s good and… • Now playing: Watch this: Now playing: Watch this: For example, they can turn a phone into a tablet, as with the Fold and Huawei Mate X. We could also see narrow phones that open vertically, as with the throwback flip phone style of the rumored foldable Motorola Razr, and even designs that bend around your wrist like a watch.”Historically, a mobile phone and a tablet have been two devices. If you think about them being the same device … it can be quite delightful,” said Samat, who has used the Galaxy Fold. Google’s support for foldable centers on App Continuity, which helps you switch apps between foldable phones’ smaller and larger screens without skipping a beat. This software is especially critical because, while device-makers have internally prototyped foldable phones for years, most developers are brand new to the design. reading • How Google plans to make foldable phones and pop-up selfie cameras better Google I/O 2019 10:12 Google I/O 2019 Aug 26 • Android Q has a name: Android 10. Here’s how you’ll use it Jul 24 • Nest Hub Max: Google’s 10-inch Assistant smart display costs $230, debuts Sept. 9 Share your voice Aug 12 • Google will ask you to migrate your Nest account soon: Here’s what you need to know 60 Photos 4:54 See All Google can read the writing on the wall: foldable phones and devices with selfie cameras that pop up from the body are set to pick up steam in 2019, and Android has to be ready. On Tuesday at I/O 2019, Google officially confirmed that it’s including tools in Android Q that will help keep the OS humming along on phones with moving parts. Google had already declared last November that it would support foldable designs like Samsung’s Galaxy Fold.Foldable phones are especially timely, promising to shake up the phone industry with new designs that can expand your screen space without making devices larger. Although early problems with the Galaxy Fold caused a delay in releasing the phone, which Samsung is scrambling to fix, other devices like the Huawei Mate X, rumored foldable Motorola Razr and designs that bend around your wrist like a watch could potentially tangle up Android apps without Google’s guidance.”We’re seeing perhaps the reinvention of the mobile form factor,” Sameer Samat, VP of product management for Android and Play, said of foldable phones during an interview. “While it’s very early, we may look back on this and understand how profound it was.” Android Q beta: What’s new? Close up with the Galaxy Fold screen, notch and hinge Comments Android 10 (Android Q) Google Originally published at 4 a.m. PT.last_img read more

12member body to be formed to resolve RMG worker unrest

first_imgWorkers of readymade garment factories continued their protest for third consecutive day. Prothom Alo File PhotoThe government on Tuesday decided to form a 12-member tripartite committee involving representatives of workers, readymade garment (RMG) factory owners and the government to resolve the ongoing problems in the country’s RMG sector by one month.“A decision has been taken to form a 12-member tripartite committee with five representatives from RMG factory owners and five from workers, and the secretaries of the industries and labour ministries to resolve the ongoing crisis in the RMG sector,” commerce minister Tipu Munshi told newsmen after a meeting of the crisis management affairs core committee, reports BSS.He said the committee will scrutinise all sorts of problems in the RMG sector and will take steps to resolve those by one month.State minister for labour and employment Begum Monnujan Sufian, labour secretary Afroza Khan, commerce secretary Md Mofizul Islam, Dhaka Metropolitan Police commissioner Asaduzzaman Miah, president of Bangladesh Garment Manufacturers and Exporters Association (BGMEA) Siddiqur Rahman, president of Federation of Bangladesh Chambers of Commerce and Industries (FBCCI) Md Shafiul Islam Mohiuddin were, among others, present at the meeting held at the Labour Department in the capital in the afternoon.Munshi urged RMG workers to join their work places and assured them of providing their salaries and allowances by one month.last_img read more

Pakistan doctor who helped track bin Laden likely to be released

first_imgA roadside vendor sells newspapers with headlines about the death of al-Qaeda leader Osama bin Laden, in Lahore. Reuters file photoPakistani prison authorities have moved the jailed doctor believed to have helped the CIA hunt down Osama bin Laden, his attorney said on Saturday, speculating it could be a prelude to his release.The continued imprisonment of Dr Shakil Afridi has long been a source of tension between Pakistan and the United States, which cut military aid over accusations Pakistan continues to shelter Taliban militants fighting US and Afghan soldiers across the border in Afghanistan.A jail official in the northwestern city of Peshawar told Reuters on condition of anonymity that Afridi had been transferred to Adiala prison in Rawalpindi, near the capital Islamabad, but said the reasons were unclear and could simply be security-related.Afridi’s lawyer, Qamar Nadeem, confirmed the transfer of his client but said he was not sure where he was now. Judicial officials could not be reached on Saturday, nor could embassy officials for the United States, which has for years called on Pakistan to release Afridi.Afridi was accused of treason after word spread he had helped the CIA collect genetic samples of the bin Laden family, paving the way for a US Navy SEAL raid in 2011 in the town of Abbottabad that killed the al Qaeda leader accused of plotting the 11 Sept 2001 attacks on the United States that killed nearly 3,000 people.He was arrested days after the U.S. operation – which Pakistan called a violation of its sovereignty – and charged with aiding terrorists.Afridi was sentenced to 23 years’ jail for financing terrorism. That conviction was overturned in 2013, but he is still serving time for other terrorism-related convictions, his lawyer said.He also faced a murder trial related to the death of a patient more than a decade ago.However, the layer said Afridi had recently had his latest sentence reduced to seven years in a clemency action, and had served about that amount of time already.“So I think he can be released very soon,” Nadeem told Reuters.There were no other immediate indications of any release in the works, however.A US State Department official, speaking on the condition of anonymity, called on the Pakistani government to ensure Afridi’s safety.“We are aware ýof reports that Dr. Afridi has been transferred to another prison, and call on the Government of Pakistan to take all necessary measures to ensure Dr. Afridi’s safety,” the official said.“We don’t have anything else at this time and would refer you to the government of Pakistan as to the reasons for his transfer,” the official added.In January 2017, Pakistan’s then-law minister said the country would not release Afridi under any U.S. pressure.“Afridi worked against the law and our national interest, and the Pakistan government has repeatedly been telling the United States that under our law he committed a crime and was facing the law,” Zahid Hamid was quoted as saying at the time.last_img read more

DC Mayor Signs Pot Decriminalization Bill

first_imgWASHINGTON (AP) — District of Columbia Mayor Vincent Gray has signed a bill that decriminalizes possession of small amounts of marijuana.Like all new laws in the district, the bill now goes to Congress for review. House Speaker John Boehner has said Congress will “look at” the bill. Seventeen states have some form of decriminalization, and Congress rarely acts to invalidate district laws.Gray signed the bill on Monday, a day before Democratic primary voters will decide whether he should receive a second term. The bill’s lead sponsor is one of the mayor’s opponents, D.C. Councilmember Tommy Wells.Wells describes the law as “a victory for the district and a victory for justice,” citing a study that found black residents were eight times more likely than whites to be arrested for pot possession.last_img read more

Gutting Gun Bill A Good Omen

first_imgOn July 25 the Baltimore City Council’s Judiciary and Legislative Investigations Committee voted 5-2 to amend the council’s ill-fated attempt to impose a mandatory minimum one-year sentence on anyone “illegally” carrying a gun within 100 yards of a school, public park, church or any other public facility in the city.The revised bill would impose the one-year sentence only on those committing a second gun possession offense or carrying a gun in commission of a crime against a person or property. Ultimately, the amended measure would be neutralized by existing Maryland law.The response to the original proposed legislation was fast, furious and decidedly negative in many of the city’s mostly Black, mostly poor communities. However, the council’s actions to gut the bill may have avoided a catastrophe similar to what we witnessed in April 2015 following the death (some say murder) of Freddie Gray.Sean Yoes (Courtesy Photo)This wasn’t just a knee jerk response to the very real crisis of violence and murder this city has endured over the last three years (although many would argue the epidemic of violence has been at a crisis level for decades). There is a tone deaf quality to the argument that implementing a mandatory minimum gun law in Baltimore City would somehow assuage our fears and deter violence.In fact, several people who work at City Hall have asked privately, ”Who advised the mayor on this legislation?“ “Mandatory minimums don’t work,” said Councilman Brandon Scott (D-2nd) during last week’s tumultuous hearing prior to the council committee stripping down the hapless gun law.However, the result of implementing the bill as it was originally crafted would have almost assuredly resulted in hundreds, if not thousands, more arrests by the end of 2017.How many of those arrests would have fallen into the category of “illegal arrests” a term made popular during the days of the nefarious zero tolerance policing implemented by then Mayor Martin O’Malley? There are thousands of Black men, their families and communities that still have not recovered from the zero tolerance policy, which at its zenith, was responsible for the arrest of more than 100,000 people per year for several years, in a city of just over 600,000 people.Many argue, with our city being ravaged by violence and 206 homicides (as of August 2), we are at a very tenuous tipping point in Baltimore. The implementation of a mandatory minimum gun law and its aftermath could have had a similar effect as the bad days of zero tolerance policing, possibly recreating circumstances that sparked the uprising of 2015. We underestimate that potential at our own peril.I guess the original bill could technically be resurrected, but it seems highly unlikely because of the vigilance of several of the council’s youngest and newest members.The “renegade eight,” the eight newest members of the council voted in during last year’s general election, entered the chamber with the hopes of many of the city’s most disenfranchised citizens riding on their shoulders. In these cynical political times punctuated over the last six months by the unprecedented and potentially apocalyptic antics of the 45th president, hope in our political leaders has been hard to come by.Yet, the newest members of the council began their tenures by spearheading the unanimous condemnation  of statements made by President Donald Trump, just days prior to his visit to Baltimore in December 2016. The first official action of the council denounced Trump’s “divisive and scapegoating rhetoric, rooted in hate and prejudice.” And the rebuke of Trump came as Mayor Catherine Pugh was preparing to ask the 45th president for much needed federal resources for the city. It was a symbolic gesture of course, but perhaps one that set a critical tone going forward.However, the council’s actions in snuffing out the mandatory minimum gun law was real action taken against what many argue was a really bad bill. And in the process they may have diffused  a very volatile situation in our city festering beneath the summer sun.Sean Yoes is the AFRO’s Baltimore editor and host and executive producer of First Edition, which airs Monday through Friday, 5p.m.-7 p.m. on WEAA, 88.9.last_img read more

Devils Hole pupfish found to be a lot younger than thought

first_imgDevils Hole pupfish (Cyprinodon diabolis). Credit: Olin Feuerbacher, USFWS / Wikipedia The existence of small, goldfish sized, dark blue fish living in a water filled fissure in the Mojave Desert has led to many theories regarding how they got there and how they have survived. For many years, the consensus has been that they got there due to flooding during the Pleistocene epoch, approximately 10 to 20,000 years ago. How they managed to survive for so long in such a remote, small and hot environment has been a mystery. But now, new evidence suggests that the pupfish may not have been living in the Hole for nearly that long.Prior research has shown that the pupfish are a unique species—with features that are unique to them alone among pupfish, such as the lack of a dorsal fin, bigger eyes and darker scales. To learn more about the origins of the species, which scientists have described as having the smallest range of any vertebrate on Earth, the group conducted a genetic analysis of 56 pupfish from around the Death Valley area (including one of the pupfish from Devils Hole which was found dead) and other parts of the world, sequencing over 13,000 different stretches of DNA—a process that allowed them to create a family tree. To gauge the historical age of the pupfish from Devils Hole, the team averaged the rate of gene mutations in its cousins. Doing so showed that the fish likely first inhabited their isolated environment approximately 105 to 830 years ago and then evolved very quickly to allow them to survive.The researchers did not find any evidence that might explain how the fish got there during that time frame, but suggest it is possible that people living in the area put them there as a means of maintaining a food source in the desert, or perhaps birds carried fish eggs from other, less remote water sources. Biological sciences professor publishes pupfish research Journal information: Proceedings of the Royal Society B Explore further © 2016 Phys.orgcenter_img (Phys.org)—A team of researchers from several institutions in the U.S. has found evidence that suggests that pupfish living in Devils Hole are not nearly as ancient as has been previously assumed. In their paper published in the journal Proceedings of the Royal Society B, the team describes a genetic study they conducted on the fish and others that are related to them, and what they found as a result. More information: Christopher H. Martin et al. Diabolical survival in Death Valley: recent pupfish colonization, gene flow and genetic assimilation in the smallest species range on earth, Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences (2016). DOI: 10.1098/rspb.2015.2334AbstractOne of the most endangered vertebrates, the Devils Hole pupfish Cyprinodon diabolis, survives in a nearly impossible environment: a narrow subterranean fissure in the hottest desert on earth, Death Valley. This species became a conservation icon after a landmark 1976 US Supreme Court case affirming federal groundwater rights to its unique habitat. However, one outstanding question about this species remains unresolved: how long has diabolis persisted in this hellish environment? We used next-generation sequencing of over 13 000 loci to infer the demographic history of pupfishes in Death Valley. Instead of relicts isolated 2–3 Myr ago throughout repeated flooding of the entire region by inland seas as currently believed, we present evidence for frequent gene flow among Death Valley pupfish species and divergence after the most recent flooding 13 kyr ago. We estimate that Devils Hole was colonized by pupfish between 105 and 830 years ago, followed by genetic assimilation of pelvic fin loss and recent gene flow into neighbouring spring systems. Our results provide a new perspective on an iconic endangered species using the latest population genomic methods and support an emerging consensus that timescales for speciation are overestimated in many groups of rapidly evolving species. Citation: Devils Hole pupfish found to be a lot younger than thought (2016, January 27) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2016-01-devils-hole-pupfish-lot-younger.html This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more