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Uruguay agrees to take Guantanamo detainees

first_imgMONTEVIDEO, Uruguay – Uruguay’s President José Mujica said Thursday that his country had agreed to receive detainees from the U.S. military prison at Guantanamo Bay, calling the decision a matter of human rights.U.S. President Barack Obama is struggling to fulfill his five-year-old promise to close the controversial jail, and countries have been slow to come forward and agree to accept transferred inmates.Uruguay would be the first country in South America to do so.It was “a question of human rights,” Mujica later told reporters, without giving the number of prisoners to be accepted.The prisoners “haven’t seen a judge, haven’t seen a prosecutor, and the president of the United States wants to resolve this problem as well,” he added. “They asked a lot of countries if they could give shelter, and I said yes.”A high-level government source told AFP that Uruguay would host five former inmates for at least two years, confirming a report first published in the weekly Búsqueda newspaper.In Washington, Pentagon spokesman Lt. Col. Todd Breasseale said only: “The United States has engaged the government of Uruguay to discuss the issue of closing the detention facility at Guantanamo.”Búsqueda said Obama had raised the issue with Mujica in recent weeks through “emissaries.”Mujica had discussed the issue with Cuban President Raúl Castro, who supported the idea, during a visit in January, the paper added.It said U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry thanked Mujica on Monday and confirmed Obama would receive him in the White House before the end of June.State Department spokeswoman Jen Psaki confirmed only that Kerry and Mujica had spoken on Monday.An official visit by Mujica to the United States had been planned for last year but was postponed due to scheduling issues.Transfers out of Guantanamo have increased recently, the latest taking place this month when an Algerian was repatriated against his will because he feared abuse in his homeland.Some 154 inmates remain at the prison, erected at a U.S. Naval base in Cuba by former president George W. Bush after the Sept. 11, 2001 terror attacks. Most have never been charged or tried.Obama has said the prison has damaged the U.S.’ standing in the world, but his plan to shutter the facility has been thwarted in part by Congress, which has banned transferring inmates to U.S. soil.Human Rights First called the move a “step in the right direction” towards closing the prison. Facebook Comments Related posts:6 Guantanamo detainees turned over to Uruguay US prepares to ramp up transfers from Guantanamo Mujica: US admits former Guantanamo prisoners in Uruguay had no ties to terrorism White House finalizing plan to close Guantanamo prisonlast_img read more

April 4 2002 This series of photos depict the rec

first_imgApril 4, 2002 This series of photosdepict the recent mammoth pour. Our construction team poured 112 tonsof concrete, which came to about 58 cubic yards delivered in 6 trucks.Remember this shot from the posting on March 26? This is the secondfloor of Unit 6 and 7 of the East Crescent showing the rebar cage before the pour.[Photo: David Tollas &text: Sue Anaya] On the morning of thepour construction manager Spencer Marrese-Atom is talkingthrough the expected chain of events with his crew in the classroom.[Photo: Ray Lam & text: SA] The first concretetruck is pulling up to the boom pump. [Photo & text: SA] Volunteer AndyBradshaw is stuffing a test cylinder with a sample from the first batchof concrete. The tubes are sent to a lab for compression strength.[Photo & text: SA] Workshopper SorenManillen is wetting down the forms before the pour. [Photo & text: SA] The pour starts atthe southwest corner of unit 6. [Photo: RL & text: SA] Constructionsupervisor Ray Shong is guiding the vibrating screed while Scott Reillyis smoothing out the surface with a giant bullfloat. [Photo: RL & text:SA] The pour in progress.[Photo: RL & text: SA] A view from the 3rdfloor of the 5th unit of the progress of the pour. [Photo: RL & text:SA] Our welding man RonChandler is guiding the pump hose. [Photo: Nadia Begin & text: SA] A view from thesky-suite onto the almost completed pour. [Photo: Nadia Begin & text:SA] With the pourcomplete there is still a lot of detail work to be done. [Photo & text:SA] Volunteer JunkoKobayashi is doing some of the edgework. Junko has gone back to Japan.[Photo & text: SA] Monster pourcomplete.last_img read more

US online video site and web series specialist Bli

first_imgUS online video site and web series specialist Blip is looking to make a UK hire as it aims to expand its business into Europe. Speaking to DTVE, Blip CEO Kelly Day said it was looking to hire someone in the UK to focus on “producer relationships,” tapping into new video creator talent on this side of the Atlantic.“It’s the beginning of having more of a foundation in London, Day said, adding that London would also serve as a jumping-off point for other major European markets. The firm interviewed candidates for the role earlier this month.In terms of further expansion plans, Day said: “We are looking at some of the non-European countries as interesting markets and thinking about strategies there – Latin America is interesting and we’re looking at more Spanish-language content. India is very interesting, and [we are also] looking at potential partners in India.”Blip is home to original web series from professional and up-and-coming producers and airs dramas, comedies and other categories of online video for free.It has also started developing partnerships with some of the bigger YouTube channels to create vertical branded destination sites. It recently signed a deal with FremantleMedia North America to develop a new pet-related entertainment destination on Blip, with the content to also be available across the web. Fremantle originally launched its Pet Collective channel on YouTube as part of the latter’s original channels initiative, but the channel no longer being funded by YouTube.last_img read more

During Thursdays talk Willie and Hugo will give t

first_imgDuring Thursday’s talk Willie and Hugo will give their account of the desperate living conditions in the camp and the stigma attached to the address, as well as revealing some of the statistics about life in the camp down through the years. The talk will include maps and resident lists from their research. Hugo will share some of his memories of growing up on the camp as a boy, which he describes as “tales from the beat, the burn, and the bridge” and his stories of the freedom and innocence of growing up in Springtown.Speaking ahead of the event Hugo encouraged other residents of the camp to come along and share their own memories. “We would like to welcome as many former residents of Springtown Camp as possible to the talk,” he said. “This is our collective shared history.” Learning and Engagement Officer with the Tower Museum, Emma McGarrity, said the story of Springtown Camp formed an important chapter of the city’s history.“The conditions which people were forced to live in at the camp prompted people to begin the campaign of protest about the housing crisis in Derry. ShareTweet Emma McGarrityGuildhallTower MuseumTower Talk to explore this week the story of Springtown CampWillie Deery THE next in the summer series of Tower Talks will focus on the story of Springtown Camp, with accounts from two former residents of the camp who are hoping to establish a permanent memorial to the former American naval base which became home to an entire community.The talk will take place in the Tower Museum’s Learning Space this Thursday, July 5, at 7pm, when Willie Deery and Hugo McConnell will share their experience among the hundreds of families who made the camp their home in the 1940’s.Thousands of local people occupied the tin huts which were vacated by the American military at a time when the shortage of local houses meant many families were forced to live in cramped squalid conditions. The poorly constructed army issue tin huts provided a roof over the heads of many desperate people and the camp, which is now the site of Springtown Industrial Estate, became its own community. “In 1959 the women of Springtown camp were the first of the city’s residents to bring their protest about poor housing conditions to the Guildhall. “Later in January 1964, the people of Springtown marched in protest at their housing conditions, a prelude to the protests that were to come later in the same decade.An artist’s impression of the proposed model Nissen hut at Springtown. Pic by Willie Deery“This talk will offer the chance to hear more about what local people had to endure and Willie and Hugo will explain how the actions of the Springtown Camp residents inspired future campaigns for housing equality in Derry.”The talk is part of the Speeches, Strikes and Struggles series which marks the 50th anniversary of the Civil Rights movement with a full programme of events, exhibitions and activities taking place throughout the year.Admission is free and you can book a place by contacting the Tower Museum on 02871372411 or emailtower.reception@derrystrabane.comTower Talk to explore the story of Springtown Camp this week was last modified: July 2nd, 2018 by John2John2 Tags:last_img read more

The Medicaid expansion promoted by the Affordable

first_imgThe Medicaid expansion promoted by the Affordable Care Act was a boon for St. Mary’s Medical Center, the largest hospital in western Colorado. Since 2014, the number of uninsured patients it serves has dropped by more than half, saving the nonprofit hospital in Grand Junction more than $3 million a year.But the prices the hospital charges most insured patients have not gone down.”St. Mary’s is still way too costly,” says Mike Stahl, CEO of Hilltop Community Resources, which provides insurance to about half its nearly 600 employees and their families in western Colorado.”We are not seeing the decreases in our overall health bills that I believe the community overall should be feeling,” Stahl says.He and other employers in Colorado hoped that, as hospitals saved millions of dollars in charity care from the Medicaid expansion, the institutions would pass along some of those savings, reducing the prices consumers pay as well as the overall health costs paid by employers.A recent state report finds that didn’t happen.While hospitals are financially better off since the expansion, they have begun shifting even more of their costs to commercial health plans, according to the report.The state researchers note the average hospital profit per each patient discharged rose to $1,359 in 2017 — twice the amount in 2009. For patients covered by commercial and employer-based health plans, the hospitals’ profit margins per discharge rose above $11,000 in 2017, compared with $6,800 in 2009.Julie Lonborg, a spokeswoman for the Colorado Hospital Association, says the state agency that did the study was biased against hospitals and had a “predetermined conclusion.” Hospitals in the state are not doing as well as the report suggests, Lonborg says, noting that a third of them face operating losses.And some insurers, she says, have not passed along to their customers the savings hospitals give the insurers.Hundreds of thousands of state residents gained coverage under the Medicaid expansion, lowering Colorado’s uninsured rate by half to 7 percent. In addition, hospitals’ uncompensated care costs dropped by more than 60 percent, or more than $400 million statewide.Kim Bimestefer, executive director of the Colorado Department of Health Care Policy & Financing, says that hospitals have used their expanded revenues to focus on adding services that provide high profits or expanding operations in wealthier areas of the state that often duplicate what is already available.”They used those dollars to build free-standing [emergency departments], acquire physician practices [and] build new facilities where there was already sufficient capacity,” she says. “Hospitals had a fork in the road to either use the money coming in to lower the cost-shift to employers and consumers or use the money to fuel a health care arms race. With few exceptions, they chose the latter.”Hospital’s profit margin doublesIn written testimony to the state legislature last year, Colorado officials pointed to St. Mary’s as an example of a hospital with high overhead and operating costs — factors they said can lead to higher insurance premiums.The facility’s profit margin was above 14 percent from 2015 to 2017, according to the latest available tax returns. Those figures are nearly double St. Mary’s margin before expansion and twice the margin of the average U.S. hospital in 2017, according to American Hospital Association data.Colorado is the first state to analyze whether hospital cost-shifting — often referred to as a “hidden tax” on health plans — dropped after Medicaid expansion.But a conservative think tank in Arizona says hospitals there did not cut prices following that state’s Medicaid expansion.”Not only did [it] fail to deliver on the promises of alleviating the hidden health care tax, it allowed urban hospitals to increase charges on private payers dramatically,” says a report from the Phoenix-based Goldwater Institute.Some critics point out that hospitals are also benefiting because Congress has repeatedly delayed a key ACA provision that would have cut federal funding to hospitals that have large numbers of uninsured patients and patients on Medicaid.The continuation of the program — called Medicaid disproportionate share hospital payments — has provided Colorado hospitals a total of $108 million.How outside costs may factor inThe hospital industry disputes reports that it has merely pocketed profits from Medicaid expansion. Hospitals say many factors influence how much they charge employers and private insurers, including the need to upgrade technology and meet rising costs of health care and drugs.Lonborg of the state hospital association says hospitals need to shift costs to private employers to make up for lower prices paid by Medicare and Medicaid, and to make up for care hospitals continue to give free of cost to the uninsured.But, she adds, other factors, including the need to keep up with rapid population growth, have kept costs from dropping.Janie Wade, chief financial officer for SCL Health, the Broomfield, Colo., hospital chain that owns St. Mary’s and seven other facilities, says its costs are higher because it has sicker and older patients than most.She says looking at just the hospital profit margins on St. Mary’s IRS-990 form is not a fair assessment, because it doesn’t take into account costs that are outside the hospital, such as its 93 physician practices. The hospital lost nearly $12 million on those doctor practices in 2017, she says.Across all operations, the hospital’s operating margin fell from 9.5 percent in 2015 to 4.5 percent in 2018, she adds.Wade says the hospital used some of its new revenue to purchase 14 physician practices in recent years. That was designed, she says, not to ensure they send their patients to St. Mary’s but to help keep those doctors in the city so they can staff important services such as trauma and maternity care.”Medicaid expansion was a good thing and, of course, we supported it,” Wade says.But she points out that the hospital loses money on Medicaid and Medicare, which together cover more than three-quarters of its patients.St. Mary’s has sought to keep price increases for commercial insurers and employers to no more than the general inflation rate and has made rate even lower for some, according to Wade. If employers’ rates have been rising more than that, she says, it’s likely because insurers have been adding price increases.Officials from Rocky Mountain Health Plans, one of Grand Junction’s largest insurers and recently acquired by UnitedHealthcare, would not comment.David Roper, who used to oversee employee benefits for the city of Grand Junction and now heads a local employer coalition, says the state report confirms what local businesses leaders have long known. “St. Mary’s has no incentive to reduce its costs,” he says.Edmond Toy, a senior adviser for the nonprofit Colorado Health Institute, says the argument that pursuing the ACA policy would help lower insurance premiums “broadened the appeal of Medicaid expansion … and conceptually it makes total sense.”But, he notes, health care analysts have long debated whether the higher prices hospitals charge people with private insurance are designed to make up for the losses they take on with Medicare, Medicaid and uninsured patients.The state report shows how hospitals in heavily consolidated markets don’t have to cut prices as their bottom line improves, Toy says. “They can charge whatever the market will bear.”Marianne Udow-Phillips, director of the Center for Health and Research Transformation at the University of Michigan, says hospitals have considerable bargaining power in many places because of health system consolidations and their purchases of many physician practices.”It does appear Colorado hospitals have a strong negotiating position with payers, or payers there are not negotiating very effectively,” Udow-Phillips says. “Hospitals are not going to give it away.”Kaiser Health News is a nonprofit news service and editorially independent program of the Kaiser Family Foundation. KHN is not affiliated with Kaiser Permanente. Copyright 2019 Kaiser Health News. To see more, visit Kaiser Health News.last_img read more

A disabled university lecturer was forced to live

first_imgA disabled university lecturer was forced to live in a residential home for older people for seven months because of a crisis in accessible housing that is “spiralling out of control”, according to a new report.Dr Chetna Patel was moving from Scotland to Sheffield for a new university job, but was unable to find any suitable homes for her access needs as a wheelchair-user.Dr Patel said: “I was desperate and needed to move and take up my post; a social worker came up with the solution of my staying in a residential home for the elderly. “I had no other option and so accepted it. The home did its best but it was a battle to keep my motivation up as I lost much of my independent life whilst in there.”Her case is just one of many collected by the charity Muscular Dystrophy UK while compiling its Breaking Point report on housing for disabled people in England.It says the crisis in accessible housing is “spiralling out of control”, and has called for central government and local authorities to lead a “revolution in the building of accessible homes”.In another case, John Harrison, from Winsford, Cheshire, has had to reply on his wife to wash him for more than a year, because their bath and shower are completely unsuitable for him.   He has already paid £16,000 to have his kitchen adapted, but cannot afford another £8,000, which the council says he has to contribute towards installing a wet-room.He said: “I have quite simply exhausted my funds in adapting my home, and I cannot afford to put up a further £8,000 to change the bathroom.“This is really taking its toll but without support from the council and without sufficient personal finance, I’m unable to make the adaptations that I need.”In some parts of the country, there are more than 100 disabled people and their families waiting for accessible accommodation, according to councils that responded to freedom of information requests submitted this summer by the charity.One council, Croydon, had 176 people on its waiting list for wheelchair-accessible housing at the time it responded, but not a single wheelchair-accessible property available.Another, Harlow, had 166 people on the waiting-list, and again not a single suitable property available, while Blackpool had 258 people waiting and only five homes available.Muscular Dystrophy UK told MPs and housing leaders this week at a meeting in parliament of the all-party parliamentary group for muscular dystrophy that the lack of wheelchair-accessible housing was having a “devastating” impact on disabled people and their families, with some racking up huge debts and being forced to spend their life savings to adapt their homes.Others were having to struggle to live in properties in which they could not use bathrooms and kitchens.Some councils will not even allow a resident to join the housing waiting-list until they have lived in the area for five years.More than a third of individuals and families surveyed said they had found themselves in serious debt because of having to fund adaptations to their homes themselves, while 70 per cent of those questioned said they were in properties that did not meet their mobility needs.Fleur Perry (pictured), who herself waited for two years before she was offered a suitable property by her local authority, says in the report: “Though housing providers have legal obligations to consider the needs of local people with disabilities, there seems to be no consistently used method to accurately assess the number of accessible homes the community needs.“There are also no figures showing just how much it costs the NHS to treat people injured by accidents due to inaccessible housing, nor the short or long-term social care costs that result from this.“I consider myself lucky to have found my little bungalow in just over two years; I have heard of people waiting several times this long.”Muscular Dystrophy UK has called on the government to increase the maximum amount paid out under the disabled facilities grants (DFG) scheme – the current maximum of £30,000, which is means-tested for adults, has not risen since 2008 – and ensure that this continues to rise in line with inflation.It also wants to see all local authorities consider discretionary top-up payments – which they are legally allowed to make – for disabled people who cannot fund all of their adaptations through a DFG.The freedom of information responses showed more than a third of councils had made no discretionary payments.And the charity says that local authorities should ensure that at least 10 per cent of all new homes within property developments are wheelchair-accessible, and that all new homes are built using the Lifetime Homes standard.The charity says it is also concerned that some local authorities do not have their own accessible housing register.A Department for Communities and Local Government spokeswoman said: “The government is committed to helping disabled people live as comfortably and independently as possible in their own homes.“We have invested just over £1 billon through the DFGs since 2010 to fund adaptations to homes.“This has helped thousands of disabled people live safely at home, funding around 170,000 adaptations, but we are always listening to the sector to see how we can best provide for those most in need.“We are also getting Britain building again with more than 570,000 new homes built since April 2010.”last_img read more

Google Amazon Expand Into OnDemand Home Services

first_img October 2, 2015 This story originally appeared on CNBC –shares 4 min read Tech Reporter Home Improvement Add to Queue Next Article Image credit: Startup Stock Photos | Stocksnap.io Amazon and Google are vying to become the Uber for handymen and capitalize on the growth of the on-demand services industry. A recent Intuit survey estimates 7.6 million Americans will be working in the so-called “gig” economy by 2020, more than double the current total of 3.2 million people.”This is a multibillion-dollar market, and clearly the incumbents have not done an effective job in providing a seamless, safe and positive experience for users,” said Mizuho Securities analyst Neil Doshi. “Just looking at stock prices of Angi and Yelp, there seems to be an opportunity for larger players or new start-ups to disrupt this space.” Amazon is diving head-on into delivering on-demand services. The e-commerce giant launched Amazon Flex on Tuesday, enabling delivery drivers in Seattle to sign up for shifts through an app. In March, it rolled out Amazon Home Services, powered by service marketplace start-up TaskRabbit.”In less than 60 seconds, customers can browse, purchase and schedule tons of professional services from wall mounting a new TV to installing a new garbage disposal to house cleaning, directly on Amazon.com,” said an Amazon spokesperson.Amazon also recently expanded Home Services, which offers more than 900 professional services, to 15 cities in the US. The company guarantees all purchases, so if customers are not satisfied, they get their money back. “People are always afraid that a plumber or contractor might rip them off, so the platform that can provide transparency in price and recourse for quality will be the winner. We like Amazon’s approach this far. And Amazon has deep pockets and a lot of patience,” said Doshi.In contrast to Amazon, Google is dipping its toes into the space, quietly beta-testing a new AdWords Express product in the Bay Area over the past several weeks. Home Service Ads invites plumbers, cleaners, locksmiths and other providers to advertise and manage customer inquiries, correspondence and appointments, all through Google. Home Service Ads are displayed as sponsored search results above organic search results. Homeowners can browse profiles, reviews and ratings, and contact up to three people at once to compare quotes. The company declined to comment.The search giant is touting the new ad product on its website: “Google will show your ads on our platform, and we’ll help customers find you and set up appointments. The rest is up to you.” Google screens businesses and requires background checks, proof of insurance and licenses, but does handle transactions. The search giant also warns contractors: “Serious or repeatedly negative customer feedback may result in lower ad rankings (including your ad not showing at all).”First Analysis Securities Corp. analyst Todd Van Fleet is bullish on the opportunity: “I think Google and Amazon are both well positioned to address the home-services market. The question is whether there’s a multitude of players. The obvious answer is yes. It’s a huge marketplace.”But Doshi is skeptical about Google’s ability to win this battle: “Google has always had issues on the local side, and Amazon is coming at this market with a unique value proposition (high quality and guaranteed price).”Both Google and Amazon are entering a crowded marketplace, competing with well-funded and established start-ups: “We think Home Advisor, Thumbtack, TalkLocal or some of the other unique start-ups could be in a position to take share,” said Doshi.Six-year-old Thumbtack is building a war chest to fight the rising competition, and CEO Marco Zappacosta says growth is strong. His biggest challenge is keeping up with demand: “We’re actually supply constrained; we have more demand than we can fulfill.” The company announced on Tuesday that it had raised $125 million at a valuation of $1.3 billion from investors that included Baillie Gifford, Tiger Global, Sequoia Capital and Google Capital. 2019 Entrepreneur 360 List Harriet Taylor Google, Amazon Expand Into On-Demand Home Services The only list that measures privately-held company performance across multiple dimensions—not just revenue. Apply Now »last_img read more

Dells Cybersecurity Unit SecureWorks Plans IPO

first_img Dell’s cybersecurity business unit SecureWorks is planning an initial public offering.The Atlanta, GA.-based company said it would trade on NASDAQ under the stock ticker SCWX, according to a regulatory filing on Thursday. SecureWorks did not disclose the price of its shares or the number available.It said it plans to raise $100 million from the stock sale, but that amount was likely just a placeholder.Denali Holding Inc., the parent company of Dell, will maintain a large stake in SecureWorks, thus making it a “controlled company” under NASDAQ marketplace rules, the filing said. Dell’s Chairman and CEO Michael Dell, and Silver Lake managing partner Egon Durban will serve on the company’s board of directors.Dell acquired SecureWorks in 2011 for $612 million. In July, the Atlanta Business Chronicle reported that Dell was looking to spin out the security company from its portfolio.The IPO filing follows Dell’s recently announced plans to acquire business technology giant EMC for nearly $67 billion. The deal is intended to make Dell more competitive in corporate technology against giants like Hewlett-Packard Enterprise and Oracle as well as specialists in cloud computing like Amazon and Microsoft.EMC controls six independent businesses under a so-called federation model, including data storage company EMC II and data center software company VMware (VMW -1.50 percent). It also owns the security company, RSA Security, which competes with SecureWorks.SecureWorks brought in $88 million in sales in a three-month period in the company’s third quarter, which is a 32 percent increase from the $67 million it brought in the previous year during the same period.The company had a net loss of $18.5 million for the three-month period in the third quarter, which was a 111 percent increase from the $8.8 million in recorded in the previous year.Bank of America Merrill Lynch, Morgan Stanley, Goldman Sachs, JPMorgan, Barclays Capital and Citigroup Global Markets are among the several underwriters for SecureWorks’s IPO. Bank of America is SecureWorks biggest customer, accounting for 12 percent of the company’s revenue in 2015, according to the filing. Dell’s Cybersecurity Unit SecureWorks Plans IPO Dell –shares Image credit: Sergiy Palamarchuk / Shutterstock Register Now » This story originally appeared on Fortune Magazine 2 min readcenter_img December 18, 2015 Next Article Jonathan Vanian Free Webinar | July 31: Secrets to Running a Successful Family Business Learn how to successfully navigate family business dynamics and build businesses that excel. Add to Queuelast_img read more

SYZYGY Awarded IAB Gold Standard 11

first_imgDigital agency SYZYGY has been awarded the new IAB Gold Standard 1.1 certification, making it the first agency in the world in the Support category and second in the world in the Buyers category to receive the certification.The IAB created a ‘Gold Standard for Digital Advertising’ to combat the billions in ad budgets lost in the failure to focus on positive experiences for real customers and appropriate content for brands. The standard has three simple aims: to reduce ad fraud, to improve digital advertising experience and to increase brand safety.Marketing Technology News: Blue Prism Collaborates with Microsoft to Deliver Free Cloud Trial on AzureThe standard certifies that SYZYGY has met the most stringent commitments to reducing ad fraud through the complete support and implementation of the ads.txt initiative across its content and platform. It has increased brand safety by holding and promoting a JICWEBS DTSG Brand safety certificate and improved the digital ad experience for users by demonstrating a commitment to the standards set by the Coalition for Better Ads.Marketing Technology News:Aussie Anthony Capano appointed Managing Director, International at Rakuten MarketingPhil Stelter, Global Chief Media Officer at SYZYGY, said: “The fact that we are one of the first agencies to be awarded the new IAB UK Gold Standard 1.1 is a testament to our commitment to raising standards across the industry. Relationships with our clients are nothing without trust and transparency, and as the industry shifts and evolves, these factors will only grow in importance. By supporting the IAB’s focus on improving the media landscape through initiatives like this, we are helping to curb ad fraud, foster an environment of trust for brands and encourage the industry to focus once again on effective interactions with customers’ precious and limited attention.”Marketing Technology News: ANSYS Welcomes Lynn Ledwith as Vice President of Marketing Digital advertisingIAB GoldNewsPhil StelterSYZYGY Previous ArticleConnekt Technologies Launches Turn-Key Commerce Destination Featuring Aggregated Merchandise from Numerous Entertainment FranchisesNext ArticleMGID Adds Sellers.json and Support for OpenRTB SupplyChain Object to Drive Increased Trust and Transparency SYZYGY Awarded IAB Gold Standard 1.1 MTS Staff WriterJuly 16, 2019, 9:30 pmJuly 16, 2019 last_img read more